Installing MS SQL Server in Ubuntu 18.04

This has been an issue for sometime until now. I found the following link that help me install SQL Server on the latest Ubuntu 18.04:

https://askubuntu.com/questions/1032532/how-do-i-install-ms-sql-for-ubuntu-18-04-lts

But, there are few missing steps which can help ease the burden of errors. At the same time, the information is a little out-dated.

But, it works with the following adjustments.

Please Understand!!  This is NOT approved by Microsoft.  Use this method for Test Only!!

Create Your Installation

The following instructions help you download and get the dpkg package ready for you Ubuntu 18.04 SQL Server installation:

  • Create the folders to extract, and make changes to repackage the dpkg SQL Server installation:
cd ${HOME} && mkdir -p tmp/mssql/newpkg/DEBIAN/ && cd tmp/mssql
  • Download the latest version of SQL Server dpkg to the current folder location: (dpkg SQLServer date: 20-Jun-2018 18:03)
wget https://packages.microsoft.com/ubuntu/16.04/mssql-server-2017/pool/main/m/mssql-server/mssql-server_14.0.3029.16-1_amd64.deb
  • Extract the dpkg package:
dpkg-deb -x mssql-server_14.0.3029.16-1_amd64.deb newpkg/
dpkg-deb -e mssql-server_14.0.3029.16-1_amd64.deb newpkg/DEBIAN/
  • Next step will change the OpenSSL version to avoid failure during SQL Server installation:
sed -i -e 's#openssl (<= 1.1.0)#openssl (<= 1.1.0g-2ubuntu4.1)#g' newpkg/DEBIAN/control
cat newpkg/DEBIAN/control | grep openssl
  • Next step it to Repackage the SQL Server installation:
sudo dpkg-deb -b newpkg/ 18.04-mssql-server_14.0.3029.16-1_amd64.deb

At this stage you could try to install SQL Server, but it might failed.  This is needed in order to check what dependencies are missing. Then, make the necessary dependencies installation.

Additional Steps

As of today, July 5th, I went thru a series of trial-and-error to get my SQL Server running on my Ubuntu 18.04.

After executing the following command:

sudo dpkg -i 18.04-mssql-server_14.0.3029.16-1_amd64.deb

But, I got errors:

The following is the list of all my missing dependencies on Ubuntu 18.04 for the SQL Server installation:

dpkg: dependency problems prevent configuration of mssql-server:
mssql-server depends on libjemalloc1; however:
Package libjemalloc1 is not installed.
mssql-server depends on libc++1; however:
Package libc++1 is not installed.
mssql-server depends on libcurl3; however:
Package libcurl3 is not installed.
mssql-server depends on openssl (<= 1.1.0); however: Version of openssl on system is 1.1.0g-2ubuntu4.1. mssql-server depends on python (>= 2.7.0); however:
Package python is not installed.
mssql-server depends on libsss-nss-idmap0; however:
Package libsss-nss-idmap0 is not installed.
mssql-server depends on gawk; however:
Package gawk is not installed.

Now, one thing to understand, if you execute the following command:

sudo apt install -f

It will clear/remove SQL Server installation components, but it also try to install some, but not all of the dependencies.

As is shown in the image, only two of the listed dependencies were installed: “gawk“, and “libsigsegv2” (this one might be from another package not for SQLServer).

So, identifying the missing dependencies can alleviate the burden of more fail attempts to install SQLServer.

The following command will install all on the listed failed dependencies, excluding OpenSSL because another version is already installed.

## - Adding the missing dependencies:
sudo apt install python libjemalloc1 libc++1 libcurl3 libsss-nss-idmap0

After all the missing dependencies are installed than I can proceed to rerun the re-package SQL Server installation for my Ubuntu 18.04. By the way, I already took care of the OpenSSL in the “Create Your Installation” step where I change the version number.

About Python Dependency?

Yes! In Ubuntu 18.04, Python version 3.6.5 is the one installed with the OS. So, Python 2.7 is not installed.

Try running the command: python –version, then python3 –version at the Terminal Console.

In order to install SQL Server in Linux, it need Python 2.7 installed in order for the installation to work. This is why I included Python in the “sudo apt install …” command to be installed with the other missing dependencies.

Finally Ready

So, finally all the dependencies have been installed. Now, I can rerun the SQL Server installation:

sudo dpkg -i 18.04-mssql-server_14.0.3029.16-1_amd64.deb

This time the installation completes without any error.

To verify that SQL Server is running, execute to following command:

sudo service mssql-server status

Next, verify from your Windows client and open SQL Server Management Studio to verify that the Ubuntu 18.04 SQL Server is accessible.

What’s Next?

Well, if you got PowerShell Core installed, then get the SQLServer Module and start to play around working with both the available cmdlets and/or start coding SMO (SQL Server Management Object) PowerShell Core scripts.

Be creative!  Check out my previous blog post “PSCore6 – SQLServer Module Expanding The Barrier Cross-Platform” for more information.

In Summary

This is a hacking technique to be able to install SQL Server in Ubuntu 18.04.  This is not supported by Microsoft, but you will be able to make it work. Basically, is a matter of installing all the missing dependencies, and change the package required OpenSSL version number to the one installed in Ubuntu 18.04.  Then, repackaging the SQL Server installation dpkg file will allow the installation to work.

Special Thanks to the contributor in the UbuntuAsk forum, as without it I won’t have figured out, and made it work

 

PSCore6 – Creating a Hybrid Cross-platform SQLServer Script

There’s some discussion around scripting on using Windows PowerShell vs PowerShell Core. So, just pick one? No.
Just think about supporting a cross-platform environment. Use both!

Following my recent post on “PSCore6 – SQLServer Module Expanding The Barrier Cross-Platform“, here’s a sample Hybrid-Script for cross-platform use.

Why not!

We all know the next generation (or evolution) of PowerShell is PowerShell Core. That’s it!
You are still using PowerShell, and Windows PowerShell is not going to be dropped nor removed any time soon.

So, why not start working towards, what I call, “Hybrid-scripting”? Powershell Core provides the necessary elements to help with cross-platform scripting.

In it’s basic code form, could look be something like this:


## - Logic Structure for executing either PowerShell Version:

## - Use Set-StrictMode for debug purpose:
Set-StrictMode -Version 5.1

If ($PSversionTable.PSEdition -eq "Desktop") {
"Windows PowerShell"
}
else {
## - Use Set-StrictMode for debug purpose:
Set-StrictMode -Version 6.1

if ($PSVersionTable.PSEdition -eq "Core") {
If ($IsWindows) {
"WindowsCore"
}
If ($IsLinux) {
"LinuxCore"
}
If ($isMacOS) {
"MacOSCore"
}
}
};

Now, let’s apply this code to a practical sample.

Sample Hybrid-Script

In the following sample script, includes Help information, begin-process-end and with try-catch code structure.
At the same time, the script will output the exception to the screen console with the failed line.

Script function name: Get-DBASQLInformation

Function Get-DBASQLInformation {</pre>
<#
.SYNOPSIS
This is a cross-platform function to Get SQL Server Information.

.DESCRIPTION
This is a cross-platform function to Get SQL Server Information using SQL Authentication.

.PARAMETER UserID
Enter SQL Authentication UserID parameter.

.PARAMETER Password
Enter SQL Authentication Password parameter.

.PARAMETER SQLServerInstance
Enter SQLServerInstance name parameter.

.EXAMPLE
PS> Get-DBASQLInformation -UserID 'sa' -Password '$SqlPwd01!' -SQLServerInstance 'mercury,1433'

.NOTES
===========================================================================
Created with: SAPIEN Technologies, Inc., PowerShell Studio 2018 v5.5.152
Created on: 5/25/2018 8:27 AM
Created by: Maximo Trinidad
Organization: SAPIEN Technologies, Inc.
Filename: Function_Get-DBASQLInformation.ps1
===========================================================================
#>
<pre>[CmdletBinding()]
[OutputType([psobject])]
param
(
[Parameter(Mandatory = $true,
Position = 0)]
[string]
$UserID,
[Parameter(Mandatory = $true,
Position = 1)]
[string]
$Password,
[Parameter(Mandatory = $true,
Position = 2)]
[string]
$SQLServerInstance
)

BEGIN {

## - Internal function:
function GetSqlInfo {
param
(
[parameter(Mandatory = $true, Position = 0)]
[string]
$U,
[parameter(Mandatory = $true, Position = 1)]
[string]
$P,
[parameter(Mandatory = $true, Position = 2)]
[string]
$S
)
Try {
## - Prepare connection passing credentials to SQL Server:
$SQLSrvConn = New-Object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common.SqlConnectionInfo($S, $U, $P);
$SQLSrvObj = new-object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server($SQLSrvConn);

## - SMO Get SQL Server Info:
$SQLSrvObj.Information `
| Select-Object parent, platform, product, productlevel, `
OSVersion, Edition, version, HostPlatform, HostDistribution `
| Format-List;

}
catch {
## - Write Exception to Console:
Write-Host `
"Excepion found on line:`r`n$($error[0].InvocationInfo.line)"+ `
"`r`n$($Error[0].Exception)" `
-ForegroundColor Magenta;

}
}

};

PROCESS {

## - Cross-platform logic:
If ($PSversionTable.PSEdition -eq "Desktop") {
Write-Host "Windows PowerShell"
GetSqlInfo -U $UserID -P $Password -S $SQLServerInstance;
}
else {

if ($PSVersionTable.PSEdition -eq "Core") {
If ($IsWindows) {
Write-Host "Windows PScore";
}
If ($IsLinux) {
Write-Host "Linux PSCore";
}
If ($isMacOS) {
Write-Host "MacOS PSCore";
}
## - execute on non-Windows:
GetSqlInfo -U $UserID -P $Password -S $SQLServerInstance;
}
};

};

END {
## - EndBlock (Optional)
};
};

The heart of the code are stored in the “Begin” section as a Internal-Function GetSQLInfo(). The internal-function will be only executed if it the criteria for each of the different platforms. The Try-Catch is just to trap the error if the SMO connection failed, or to indicate the SMO .NET wasn’t loaded.

Go ahead! Create a script file, copy/paste this code, and load this function. Give it a try cross-platforms: Windows, Linux, and MacOS.

Remember, SQLServer module is a replacement for SQLPS module. I won’t recommend having both modules installed unless you use the namespace_module/cmdlet to identify which module is going to execute the cmdlet.

So make sure to always test your scripts.

What’s Next!

This function still need to worked on, but is functional enough to test-drive and see the results. So, it be modified to support Windows Authentication. Once you start scripting and building functions, you won’t stop thinking what else can be added.

Just keep working on it and learning from the PowerShell Community.

Go Bold! Learn PowerShell Core!

PSCore6 – SQLServer Module Expanding The Barrier Cross-Platform

If you haven’t heard yet! The SQLServer Module is available for Windows, Linux, and MacOS. Yes!
And, with it,now you can even expand your scripting using .NET SQL Server Management Objects to manage your SQL Server Engine cross-platform.

How to get it!

It’s available in PowerShell Galley. Just run the following command to install the module in Windows PowerShell and PowerShell Core.
Yes, you read it! Install in PowerShell Core for Windows, Linux, and MacOS.


Install-Module -Name SQLServer -Force -Scope AllUsers

What’s in it?

Contains all of the SQL Server Management Objects .NET assemblies that will work in both Windows and non-Windows Systems. At the same time, it contains a total of 63 commands. This will support all existing SQL Server 2017(and older) on your network. Of course, there will be some limitations because there might be some features lacking in older features. But, for most use it will work.

It also includes the ability to provision the SQLSERVER: drive when you import the module.


Import-Module SQLServer

Get-PSDrive

If you care for what SMO .NET Assemblies are installed, execute the following commands:


## - Get the SQLServer Module path:
(Get-MOdule -ListAvailable SQLServer).path

## - List of all SQLServer and Analysis Services DLL's:
dir 'C:\Program Files\PowerShell\Modules\SqlServer\21.0.17262\*.dll' `
| Where-Object{$_.basename -match 'SqlServer|Analysis'} `
| Format-Wide;

## Linux CentOS - Total of SQLServer and Analysis Services DLL's:
(Get-ChildItem '/usr/local/share/powershell/Modules/SqlServer/21.0.17262/*.dll' `
| Where-Object{ $_.basename -match 'SqlServer|Analysis' }).count

Using the SQLServer: Drive

Although, I’m not a fan of using SQLServer: drive. This will allow you to navigate thru the SQL Engine like a file system from the console prompt.

In order to use the drive, it need to be recreated with the proper credentials for cross-platform use.
Below steps will create additional SQLServer: drives to another SQLServer on the *network.

###==&gt;For Windows, Linux, MacOS
Import-Module SqlServer

## - New way for Streamlining Get-Credential:
$MyUserName = 'sa'; $MyPassword = ConvertTo-SecureString '$SqlPwd01!' -asplaintext -force;
$MyCred = [System.Management.Automation.PSCredential]::new($MyUserName, $MyPassword)

## - Creating SQLSERVER: connection to Windows SQLServer:
New-PSDrive -PSProvider sqlserver -root "SQLSERVER:\SQL\sapien01,1451\default" -name MyWindowsSQL -Credential $mycred

## - List all SQLSERVER: Drives:
Get-PSDrive *SQL* | Select-Object Name, Provider, Root;

 

Note: In this example, I’m using SQL Authentication.

Now, I can navigate thru my SQLServer objects like a filesystem.


## - Change directory to SQLSERVER: drive:
cd MyWindowsSQL:/databases/sampledb1/tables
dir

Wait! Did you notice I’ve created a SQLServer Drive in MacOS? This is Awesome!
By the way, there’s no Docker involved in here. The fun doesn’t stop here!

What about using SMO scripting?

If anyone have been following me recently, everytime I’ve created the SMO script, I always have to load the assemblies before I can connect to the SQLServer.


## - When using the 'Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlManagementObjects'package installed from Nuget
## - Help find and save the location of the SMO dll's in a PowerShell variable: ver.14.17224
$smopath = Join-Path ((Get-Package Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlManagementObjects).Source `
| Split-Path) (Join-Path lib netstandard2.0);

# Add types to load SMO Assemblies only:
Add-Type -Path (Join-Path $smopath Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo.dll);
Add-Type -Path (Join-Path $smopath Microsoft.SqlServer.ConnectionInfo.dll);

The above code is not needed if the SQLServer module had been previously imported.
This way you will code less.

Here’s a small SMO script example for getting SQLServer information using SQL Authentication:


## SMO with Import-Module SQLServer
Import-Module SQLServer

## - Prepare connection strings and connect to SQL Server
$SQLServerInstanceName = 'mercury,1433';
$SQLUserName = 'sa'; $sqlPwd = '$SqlPwd01!';

## - Prepare connection to SQL Server:
$SQLSrvConn = new-object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common.SqlConnectionInfo($SQLServerInstanceName, $SQLUserName, $SqlPwd);
$SQLSrvObj = new-object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server($SQLSrvConn);

## - SMO Get SQL Server Info:
$SQLSrvObj.Information `
| Select-Object parent, platform, product, productlevel, `
OSVersion, Edition, version, HostPlatform, HostDistribution `
| Format-List;

As you can see, there’s no reason why not try and experiment using PowerShell Core with SQL Server.  Next blog post I’ll be creating this script code in the hybrid-script function that can be executed cross-platform. I mean, on any PowerShell version too.

What’s in the future!

Now that PowerShell SQLServer Module is available cross-platform, I will see others Community SQL modules (DBATools, DBAReports) making their way to PowerShell Core. Of course, it will take some before it becomes available!

In the meantime, you can use SMO to build your own PowerShell SQL Scripts. Why not! Go and Expand your horizon!!

Be Bold! Learn PowerShell Core!

Quick blog on – How to recover/rebuild Master Database in Linux?

Back in March 30th, I posted a suggestion on SQL Server forum, about there was no documentation on how to rebuild SQL Server System database(s) in Linux.

https://feedback.azure.com/forums/908035-sql-server/suggestions/33805198-sql-server-2017-on-linux-system-databases-rebuild?tracking_code=befe44dc3ccdd27370ef0f54c9c8c975

The Issue – SQL Server stopped working

For some reason, I finished doing an “sudo apt update” follow by the “sudo apt upgrade“, and after doing some OS updates “my SQL Server stopped working”. The following message was logged in the log event: (see Image)

Command executed, looking at the last log entry:  “sudo cat /var/opt/mssql/log/system_health_0_131668975728890000.xel

I look everywhere for more information but found no blog post or any documentation about it.

To my surprise! I got a quick response which I appreciate very much.

The Answer

Execute the following command in the user context
/opt/mssql/bin/sqlservr –force-setup

And, will be seen this added to the SQL Server 2017 Linux documentation.

Thanks Microsoft!!

Remember

In Ubuntu I use the following command to check the status of my SQL Server instance:

sudo systemctl status mssql-server

Make sure the status is: active: (running)!

So, Backups are important! Even in Linux.  In my case, I’m running demos and love the fact that reinstalling SQL Server only took a few minutes. But, now I know another way to solve this issue!

And, the Mic is Dropped!!

SSMS Version 17.4 no more SQLPS Module

It was just a matter of time, as it was already mention in previous SSMS (SQL Server Management Studio) documentation that SQLPS module was going to be deprecated and replace with the new SQLServer module.

See SSMS download information at: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/ssms/download-sql-server-management-studio-ssms

After SSMS Version 17.4 was release back in December, SQLPS module is no longer available. So, if you try to use the “Start PowerShell” from any of the database object, you’ll get the message “No SQL Server cmdlets found…” popup message.

New SQLServer PowerShell Module

But, no worries! Both the SSMS link and the popup message tell you where to get the new *SQLServer PowerShell module as is a separate installation from the PowerShell Gallery.

PowerShell Gallery SQLServer PowerShell Module, Get here: https://www.powershellgallery.com/packages/SqlServer/21.0.17199

One thing to point out, this module is only meant to be use on Windows PowerShell.

In other words, it will not work in PSCore6.

Housekeeping Needed

Now, there’s the chance previous SSMS installations have left the older SQLPS PowerShell Module in the system.

As is shown in the previous image, the variable $env:PSModulePath contains the path to the existing SQLPS module(s).

Either, remove the path manually using PowerShell, or thru the GUI System “Environment Variable“.

Or better yet, if you’re using SAPIEN Technologies, Inc. “PowerShell Studioproduct, the n use the Cache Editor feature to manage your existing PowerShell Modules. Check out the blog post and video about this feature at:
https://www.sapien.com/blog/2017/12/07/powershell-studio-feature-nugget-refreshing-local-cache-powershell-cmdlets-and-modules/

Video featuring PowerShell Studio Cache Editor

Option for PSCore

The only way to use PSCore6 to work with SQLServer cross-platform, is using the SMO (SQLServer Management Objects) for .NETCore, which is available in NuGet. For more information in how to install it, check my blog post at:
http://www.maxtblog.com/2017/11/streamlining-sql-server-management-objects-smo-in-powershell-core/

The only downside, you need to create the script from scratch. There’s plenty of documentation about SMO to overcome this hurdle. Most important, you are  sharpen your PowerShell scripting skills.

Don’t forget that before install any artifacts from PowerShell Gallery, NuGet, or Chocolatey the console shell need to be open “as an Administrator“.

Be Bold!! Learn PowerShell Core!!

PSCore6 – Nuget Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlManagementObjects latest Package (v140.17218.0) Broken

This is the SMO (SqlServer Management Objects) package use to create PSCore6 scripts to connect and manage SQL Server on Windows, Linux, and Azure.

But today, I found out the latest version “140.17218.0″ is broken. I had to rolled back to use an older version “140.17199.0” to get it to work again.

You can find the information about this package in this link:
https://www.nuget.org/packages/Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlManagementObjects

This NuGet SMO package version is built on .NETCore 2.0 for PSCore6, and will not install in Windows PowerShell.

Installing SMO Package

To *install the previous SMO package version “140.17199.0“, use the following command:

Install-Package Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlManagementObjects -RequiredVersion '140.17199.0'

*Note: Need to install as an Administrator.

If  the newer SMO version “140.17218.0” is installed then it will not connect. There are no errors, or failures displayed.  (See image)

This issue has been reported to NuGet SMO owners and hopefully will be resolved soon.

Testing SMO in PSCore6

Here’s the PSCore6 script for SMO testing. The script will work in both Windows and Linux.

## - Help find and save the location of the SMO dll's in a PowerShell variable:
$smopath = `
Join-Path ((Get-Package Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlManagementObjects).Source `
| Split-Path) (Join-Path lib netcoreapp2.0)

# Add types to load SMO Assemblies only:
Add-Type -Path (Join-Path $smopath Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo.dll)
Add-Type -Path (Join-Path $smopath Microsoft.SqlServer.ConnectionInfo.dll)

## - Prepare connection and credential strings for SQL Server:
## - (Connection to Windows SQL Server multi-instance sample)
$SQLServerInstanceName = 'System01,1451'; $SQLUserName = 'sa'; $sqlPwd = '$Mypwd01!';

## - Turn ON below for Linux:
## - (Connection to Linux SQL Server multi-instance sample)
# $SQLServerInstanceName = 'LinuxSystem02'; $SQLUserName = 'sa'; $sqlPwd = '$Mypwd01!';

## - Prepare connection passing credentials to SQL Server:
$SQLSrvConn = New-Object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common.SqlConnectionInfo($SQLServerInstanceName, $SQLUserName, $SqlPwd);
$SQLSrvObj = new-object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server($SQLSrvConn);

## - SMO Get SQL Server Info:
$SQLSrvObj.Information `
| Select-Object parent, platform, product, productlevel, `
OSVersion, Edition, version, HostPlatform, HostDistribution `
| Format-List;

## - End of Code

Most Important

In order for this to work, NuGet needs to be installed first. The following *code block will help to check if it’s already installed. And, if not, then it will install NuGet in PSCore6.

# Register NuGet package source, if needed
# The package source may not be available on some systems (e.g. Linux)
if (-not (Get-PackageSource | Where-Object{$_.Name -eq 'Nuget'}))
{
Register-PackageSource -Name Nuget -ProviderName NuGet -Location https://www.nuget.org/api/v2
}else{
Write-Host "NuGet Already Exist! No Need to install."
}

*Note: Thanks to the SMO guys for providing this code block to get me started testing.

Also, if you already installed the buggy NuGet SMO version, remember to use the following command to uninstall the package:

uninstall-package Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlManagementObjects

I’m hoping this blog post will help in any way.

Be Bold!! Learn PowerShell Core!!

Streamlining SQL Server Management Objects (SMO) in PowerShell Core

I’ve been recently posting about getting SQL Server Management Objects (SMO) Framework to work in PowerShell Core in both Windows and Linux Systems. So, here’s the revised blog post as the method has kept improving. This way you can start creating some cross-platform SMO PowerShell Core scripts in your environments.

It will works the following way:
1. Windows connecting to Windows SQL Server.
2. Windows connecting to Linux SQL Server.
3. Linux connecting to Linux SQL Server.
4. *Linux connecting to Windows SQL Server.

*Note: Any issues with firewall connecting from Linux to Windows, can be solved by creating the inbound rule for Linux in Windows Firewall.

How to get the SMO for PowerShell Core?

It’s easy! You can get it from NuGet Gallery using PowerShell Core Console. Just make sure you open PowerShell Core as an Administrator to avoid any installation issues.

You could use the following one-liners to find and install the recent SMO package. The following “if-else” code snippet can execute in either Windows or Linux PowerShell Core console.


# Register NuGet package source, if needed
# The package source may not be available on some systems (e.g. Linux)
if (-not (Get-PackageSource | Where-Object{$_.Name -eq 'Nuget'}))
{
Register-PackageSource -Name Nuget -ProviderName NuGet -Location https://www.nuget.org/api/v2
}else{
Write-Host "NuGet Already Exist! No Need to install."
}

Installing SMO from NuGet Gallery

After we verified NuGet Package Management is already installed in our system, then we can proceed in Find/Install “SQL Server Management Objects (SMO) Framework“. The current version is “140.17199.0”.

Execute the following one-liner by using the Find-Package to make sure is available. Then, do the install-package command


## - Check that the NuGet feed is available and has the SMO package:
Find-Package -Name Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlManagementObjects

## - Install latest SMO package from NuGet:
Install-Package -Name Microsoft.sqlserver.SqlManagementObjects -Scope CurrentUser

## - Next Line Confirmed Installation:
Get-Package Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlManagementObjects

As of today (November 6th, 2017), the current version of Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlManagementObjects is 140.17199.0. And, it can be installed on either Windows and Linux systems from NuGet.

For more NuGet information about the SMO package, click on the following link: https://www.nuget.org/packages/Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlManagementObjects

Locating SMO Assemblies and connect to SQL Server

In order to use SMO in PowerShell, we need to know where they are installed. The next one-liner gets the NuGet location to build the path of the SMO installed assemblies.


## - Help find and save the location of the SMO dll's in a PowerShell variable:
$smopath = Join-Path ((Get-Package Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlManagementObjects).Source `
| Split-Path) (Join-Path lib netcoreapp2.0)

The SMO path is saved. We are ready to load the needed SMO assemblies, to connect and work with SQL Server. The code snippet below will load the SMO assemblies, connect to SQL Server providing necessary credentials:


# Add types to load SMO Assemblies only:
Add-Type -Path (Join-Path $smopath Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo.dll)
Add-Type -Path (Join-Path $smopath Microsoft.SqlServer.ConnectionInfo.dll)

## - Prepare connection and credential strings for SQL Server:
## - (Connection to Linux SQL Server single instance sample)
$SQLServerInstanceName = 'lxSql00'; $SQLUserName = 'sa'; $sqlPwd = '$Pswrd1!';

## - (Connection to Windows SQL Server multi-instance sample)
$SQLServerInstanceName = 'winSql01,1450'; $SQLUserName = 'sa'; $sqlPwd = '$Pswrd1!';

## - Prepare connection passing credentials to SQL Server:
$SQLSrvConn = New-Object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common.SqlConnectionInfo($SQLServerInstanceName, $SQLUserName, $SqlPwd);
$SQLSrvObj = new-object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server($SQLSrvConn);

In the previous code sample, I included some variance in providing the SQl Server instance for cross-platform use:
1. In Linux, either using the “SqlServername” or, “IP-Address“.
2. In Windows, either using the “SqlServerName“, or “IP-Address“, or in the case of mutliple instance “SqlServerName,Port“.

Now that the SMO connection to the SQL Server has been established, then we can continue to explore our options using .NET SMO Framework. The Code snippet below shows how to display some of the SQL Server SMO information .NET properties:

## - SMO Get SQL Server Info:

$SQLSrvObj.Information `
| Select-Object parent, platform, product, productlevel, `
OSVersion, Edition, version, HostPlatform, HostDistribution `
| Format-List;

## - End of Code

More SMO Options…

There are additioanl sources providing SMO dll’s:
1.NuGet SMO: https://www.nuget.org/packages/Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlManagementObjects/#
2.GitHub SQLToolService: https://github.com/Microsoft/sqltoolsservice
3.Installing SQL Server mssql-scripter(Python-based): https://github.com/Microsoft/sql-xplat-cli

I’ve been using GitHub “SqlToolsService” for some time now and it works closs-platform. At the same time, I’ve been keeping it up-to-date:
https://github.com/Microsoft/sqltoolsservice/releases

Conclusion

I dare to say! Using .NET SQL Server Management Objects (SMO) Framework, let you be flexible adding control over your scripting. Keep in mind, this is well documented in Microsoft MSDN site: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/relational-databases/server-management-objects-smo/sql-server-management-objects-smo-programming-guide

My number one choice is to use NuGet Package Management. Although, you can play around with the GitHub SqlToolsService version as it gets frequent updates. The trick in using the GitHub version, is to add the path to where the Dll’s are stored and you’re good to go.

Just Dare to Experiment! Keep learning PowerShell!

Special Thanks to Microsoft: Matteo Taveggia and  David Shiflet for providing me with Nuget PowerShell code piece. I just change it a little!

FLPSUG – Next Online meeting July 26th 2017

I’m working on getting a meeting with Keiser University to allow me to host my Florida PowerShell User Group Monthly meetings at their Port St. Lucie Campus location.  But, in the meantime, I setup July’s Online meeting for Wednesday 26th at 6:30pm (EST).

This month topic:

Working with SQL Server for Linux Cross-Platform

You’re welcome to explore the latest build of SQL Server for Linux, including everything you need to install and connect to SQL Server. He will also look into the tools that are available to use from Linux and / or Windows. Maximo will provide samples on querying for database information using Python/Java and PowerShell between two environments. This will be a demo intensive session you will not want to miss!

To register, click on the following Eventbrite link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/florida-powershell-user-group-monthly-meeting-july-2017-tickets-36113308879?ref=estw

I hope you can joined me in this exciting session!

South Florida SQLSaturday – Working with SQL Server in Linux session

First! Thanks to the organizers, and specially the attendees as they waited patiently to the attend my last session of the day “Working with SQL Server for Linux Cross-Platform”. It proves to be good. Love their interaction and the will to embrace technology.

As, I almost didn’t make it to the event, due to car problem, I one my coworker gave me ride to the event at Nova Southeastern University. I missed giving the early session “SQL Server working with PowerShell and Python” so I ended up merging both sessions into one.

For my surprise, the last session went better than I expected. I ran everything from Azure Cloud which work like a charm, and the attendee were awesome.

Both presentation and all demo scripts were uploaded to the SQLSaturday #627 event site. I hope you all take advantage of the resource link I provided.

In the demo it’s interesting we covered the following on PowerShell Core, Python 3.6 (Anaconda), and SQL Server 2017 (Linux):

* In Window 10, using SSMS v17.1 connecting to SQL Server 2017 in Linux
* In Linux, connect to a Windows Shared folders
* In Windows, using SSMS to restore a Windows Database into Linux SQL Server.
* Sample script using Python tk (Gui) w/pyodbc (SQL connector), and PowerShell displaying PowerShell object in a Gridview.
* Using SMO in Linux with PowerShell.

And, we did covered a lot in a short time.

By the way, I will be giving the same session at IDERA’s Geek Synch webinar, on July 12th, at 11:00am CT/12:00pm ET:

Geek Sync – I Working with SQL Server for Linux Cross-Platform
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/9138484624537412611

Once again Thanks to everyone!

I’ll see you all in Orlando SQLSaturday #678 on October 7th!

Using Linux SQL Server SMO in PowerShell Core

Yes! It’s possible. Here’s the information in how to set it up and start doing some PowerShell scripting. But, first understand that everything posted here is still a Work-In-Progress. And, the good news, it’s all Open Source.

I hope you find the following information essential as there’s no really any instruction in how to install these components. So, let’s get started!

Where To Get It!

The Microsoft SQL Tools Service is a set of API that provided SQL Server Data Management capabilities on all system cross-platforms. It provide a small set for SMO dll’s enough to get started.

You can download the file from following Github link: https://github.com/Microsoft/sqltoolsservice 

Here’s the list of available SMO DLL’s currently include in the “SqlToolsService – ServiceLayer” file:

Microsoft.SqlServer.ConnectionInfo.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Dmf.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Sdk.Sfc.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.SmoMetadataProvider.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.SqlScriptPublishModel.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.SmoExtended.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlEnum.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlParser.dll

Keep in mind, this list will continue to grow and we hopefully expect more SMO DLL’s added.

Installation pre-requisites

In my case, I got various systems setup: Windows and Ubuntu 16.04. So, I make sure I download correct *zip or *tar.gz file

As, pre-requisite, you will needed to have already installed *”.NET Core 2.0 Preview 1” for the SQL Service Tools to work and remember this need to be installed in all systems.

Just in case, here’s the link to download “.NET Core 2.0 Preview 1“: https://www.microsoft.com/net/core/preview#windowscmd
https://www.microsoft.com/net/core/preview#linuxubuntu

Now, because we are working with PowerShell Core, don’t forget to install the latest build found at:
https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/releases

Windows Installation

You need to get the file from the latest release. At the time I writing this blog, it’s Pre-release “v1.0.0-alpha.34 – .Net Core 2.0 build“.

To make *”Sql Tools Services” to work in PowerShell Core, I had to extract all content in the file into the “C:\Program Files\PowerShell\6.0.0-Beta.x” folder. Remember, this will replace any existing DLL’s on that folder.

*Caution: This steps should be done on a test machine as there’s always a possibility that it could PowerShell Core DLL’s.

Don’t forget that all these components are still in development but this should stopped us from trying and even contributing.

The file you’ll need to download for Windows is: microsoft.sqltools.servicelayer-win-x64-netcoreapp2.0.zip

Please, for now ignore the *microsoft.sqltools.credentials*.  If you install the Credentials DLL’s in the PowerShell Beta folder, PowerShell will not work.

Linux Installation

Now, for Linux is a different story as there’s no need to add the DLL’s in the PowerShell Core folder. You need to get the file from the latest release. At the time I writing this blog, it’s Pre-release “v1.0.0-alpha.34 – .Net Core 2.0 build“.

I would recommend doing the following steps in the Bash Console:

1. At your /home/user-name location, create the sqltoolsservice folder:

maxt@MyUbuntu01:~$ mkdir sqltoolsservice

2. Change directory and Download the file for Ubuntu:

maxt@MyUbuntu01:~$ cd sqltoolsservice/
maxt@MyUbuntu01:~/sqltoolsservice$ wget https://github.com/Microsoft/sqltoolsservice/releases/download/v1.0.0-alpha.34/microsoft.sqltools.credentials-ubuntu16-x64-netcoreapp2.0.tar.gz

3. Continue extract the *tar.gz into the folder:

maxt@MyUbuntu01:~$ tar -xzvf microsoft.sqltools.credentials-ubuntu16-x64-netcoreapp2.0.tar.gz

That’s it for Linux. Now, you are ready to work with SMO and PowerShell.

Testing SMO in PowerShell Core

This is changing my way I script SMO in PowerShell. As my normal way I’ve been scripting SMO in PowerShell doesn’t work in PowerShell Core. Basically, a few more lines need to be added and now I will use the Add-Type to get the SMO assemblies loaded.

Loading SMO Assemblies

The first step is to load the SMO assemblies needed to start working with SQL Server. So, the following line is finally depricated and won’t work:

[system.reflection.assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("Microsoft.SQLServer.Smo")

The old method I’ve been using for a long time will failed because is expecting the “Property Login …” to be set.

The updated way, has been replaced by the Add-Type with the following essential three assemblies:

## - Loadind SQL Server SMO assemblied needed:
$Assem = (
"Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Sdk.Sfc",
"Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo",
"Microsoft.SqlServer.ConnectionInfo"
); Add-Type -AssemblyName $Assem;

The above assemblies are required in order to work since SQL Server SMO 2012 and greater. You can have limited use when connecting to SQL Servers version 2005, and possibly 2000.

Prepare connection parameters for Windows Systems

In Windows systems, we use ‘Integrated Authentication‘. But, here’s where things change a bit since SQL Server 2012 SMO. You will need to prepare the connection parameters, and set the *.UseIntegratedSecurity property to ‘true‘ (the default is ‘false‘). At the same time, you’ll need to set the password to ‘null’ in order to connect successfull.

## - Prepare connection strings and connect to a Windows SQL Server:
$SQLServerInstanceName = 'sqlsvrinst01,1439';
$SQLUserName = 'winUsername';
$SQLSrvConn = new-object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common.SqlConnectionInfo($SQLServerInstanceName, $SQLUserName, $null);
$SQLSrvConn.UseIntegratedSecurity = $true;
$SQLSrvObj = new-object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server($SQLSrvConn)

Now, you can query the PowerShell Object $SQLSrvObj.

## - Query PowerShell Object:
$SQLSrvObj.Information `
| Select-Object parent, platform, product, productlevel, `
OSVersion, Edition, version, HostPlatform, HostDistribution `
| Format-List;

Prepare connection parameters for Linux Systems

For Linux systems, we use ‘SQL Authentication’. Here we add the SQL User password, then passing the value to the SqlConnectionInfo class.  And, the *.UseIntegratedSecurity property by the default is ‘false‘.

## - Prepare connection strings and connect to a Linux SQL Server:
$SQLServerInstanceName = 'sqlsvrinst01,1439';
$SQLUserName = 'sqluser01'; $sqlPwd = '$usrpwd01!';
$SQLSrvConn = new-object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common.SqlConnectionInfo($SQLServerInstanceName, $SQLUserName, $SqlPwd)
$SQLSrvObj = new-object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server($SQLSrvConn)

Again, you can proceed to query the PowerShell Object $SQLSrvObj.

## - Query PowerShell Object:
$SQLSrvObj.Information `
| Select-Object parent, platform, product, productlevel, `
OSVersion, Edition, version, HostPlatform, HostDistribution `
| Format-List;

Please notice in the above image, the Windows 10 Insider Build 16215 Bash Console is running PowerShell Core. This list insider release made it possible for PowerShell Core to be functional again.

Conclusion

As we can see, this opens new opportunities to build cross-platform PowerShell scripts solutions working with SQL Servers in Linux, Windows, and others.

This is very exciting to start experiencing first hand these upcoming changes. I can’t deny that’s it’s challenging but you can’t turn down an opportunity to gain more skills.

Please, take advantage and subscribe to Microsoft Azure. Build, test, and start deploying solutions. Don’t be afraid to be creative. We all learn thru trial and errors!

This is a good time to keep up with what’s going on with technology.

Additional References:

Microsoft Azure: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/
Github: https://github.com/
Ubuntu: https://www.ubuntu.com/
Microsoft Windows Bash Shell: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/commandline/wsl/about
Microsoft Academy: https://mva.microsoft.com/
Microsoft Channel 9: https://channel9.msdn.com/
Microsoft MVP Blog: https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/mvpawardprogram/
Microsoft SQL Server Docs: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/sql-server/sql-server-technical-documentation
Microsoft PowerShell Blog: https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/powershell/