South Florida SQLSaturday – Working with SQL Server in Linux session

First! Thanks to the organizers, and specially the attendees as they waited patiently to the attend my last session of the day “Working with SQL Server for Linux Cross-Platform”. It proves to be good. Love their interaction and the will to embrace technology.

As, I almost didn’t make it to the event, due to car problem, I one my coworker gave me ride to the event at Nova Southeastern University. I missed giving the early session “SQL Server working with PowerShell and Python” so I ended up merging both sessions into one.

For my surprise, the last session went better than I expected. I ran everything from Azure Cloud which work like a charm, and the attendee were awesome.

Both presentation and all demo scripts were uploaded to the SQLSaturday #627 event site. I hope you all take advantage of the resource link I provided.

In the demo it’s interesting we covered the following on PowerShell Core, Python 3.6 (Anaconda), and SQL Server 2017 (Linux):

* In Window 10, using SSMS v17.1 connecting to SQL Server 2017 in Linux
* In Linux, connect to a Windows Shared folders
* In Windows, using SSMS to restore a Windows Database into Linux SQL Server.
* Sample script using Python tk (Gui) w/pyodbc (SQL connector), and PowerShell displaying PowerShell object in a Gridview.
* Using SMO in Linux with PowerShell.

And, we did covered a lot in a short time.

By the way, I will be giving the same session at IDERA’s Geek Synch webinar, on July 12th, at 11:00am CT/12:00pm ET:

Geek Sync – I Working with SQL Server for Linux Cross-Platform
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/9138484624537412611

Once again Thanks to everyone!

I’ll see you all in Orlando SQLSaturday #678 on October 7th!

Using Linux SQL Server SMO in PowerShell Core

Yes! It’s possible. Here’s the information in how to set it up and start doing some PowerShell scripting. But, first understand that everything posted here is still a Work-In-Progress. And, the good news, it’s all Open Source.

I hope you find the following information essential as there’s no really any instruction in how to install these components. So, let’s get started!

Where To Get It!

The Microsoft SQL Tools Service is a set of API that provided SQL Server Data Management capabilities on all system cross-platforms. It provide a small set for SMO dll’s enough to get started.

You can download the file from following Github link: https://github.com/Microsoft/sqltoolsservice 

Here’s the list of available SMO DLL’s currently include in the “SqlToolsService – ServiceLayer” file:

Microsoft.SqlServer.ConnectionInfo.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Dmf.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Sdk.Sfc.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.SmoMetadataProvider.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.SqlScriptPublishModel.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.SmoExtended.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlEnum.dll
Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlParser.dll

Keep in mind, this list will continue to grow and we hopefully expect more SMO DLL’s added.

Installation pre-requisites

In my case, I got various systems setup: Windows and Ubuntu 16.04. So, I make sure I download correct *zip or *tar.gz file

As, pre-requisite, you will needed to have already installed *”.NET Core 2.0 Preview 1” for the SQL Service Tools to work and remember this need to be installed in all systems.

Just in case, here’s the link to download “.NET Core 2.0 Preview 1“: https://www.microsoft.com/net/core/preview#windowscmd
https://www.microsoft.com/net/core/preview#linuxubuntu

Now, because we are working with PowerShell Core, don’t forget to install the latest build found at:
https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/releases

Windows Installation

You need to get the file from the latest release. At the time I writing this blog, it’s Pre-release “v1.0.0-alpha.34 – .Net Core 2.0 build“.

To make *”Sql Tools Services” to work in PowerShell Core, I had to extract all content in the file into the “C:\Program Files\PowerShell\6.0.0-Beta.x” folder. Remember, this will replace any existing DLL’s on that folder.

*Caution: This steps should be done on a test machine as there’s always a possibility that it could PowerShell Core DLL’s.

Don’t forget that all these components are still in development but this should stopped us from trying and even contributing.

The file you’ll need to download for Windows is: microsoft.sqltools.servicelayer-win-x64-netcoreapp2.0.zip

Please, for now ignore the *microsoft.sqltools.credentials*.  If you install the Credentials DLL’s in the PowerShell Beta folder, PowerShell will not work.

Linux Installation

Now, for Linux is a different story as there’s no need to add the DLL’s in the PowerShell Core folder. You need to get the file from the latest release. At the time I writing this blog, it’s Pre-release “v1.0.0-alpha.34 – .Net Core 2.0 build“.

I would recommend doing the following steps in the Bash Console:

1. At your /home/user-name location, create the sqltoolsservice folder:

maxt@MyUbuntu01:~$ mkdir sqltoolsservice

2. Change directory and Download the file for Ubuntu:

maxt@MyUbuntu01:~$ cd sqltoolsservice/
maxt@MyUbuntu01:~/sqltoolsservice$ wget https://github.com/Microsoft/sqltoolsservice/releases/download/v1.0.0-alpha.34/microsoft.sqltools.credentials-ubuntu16-x64-netcoreapp2.0.tar.gz

3. Continue extract the *tar.gz into the folder:

maxt@MyUbuntu01:~$ tar -xzvf microsoft.sqltools.credentials-ubuntu16-x64-netcoreapp2.0.tar.gz

That’s it for Linux. Now, you are ready to work with SMO and PowerShell.

Testing SMO in PowerShell Core

This is changing my way I script SMO in PowerShell. As my normal way I’ve been scripting SMO in PowerShell doesn’t work in PowerShell Core. Basically, a few more lines need to be added and now I will use the Add-Type to get the SMO assemblies loaded.

Loading SMO Assemblies

The first step is to load the SMO assemblies needed to start working with SQL Server. So, the following line is finally depricated and won’t work:

[system.reflection.assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("Microsoft.SQLServer.Smo")

The old method I’ve been using for a long time will failed because is expecting the “Property Login …” to be set.

The updated way, has been replaced by the Add-Type with the following essential three assemblies:

## - Loadind SQL Server SMO assemblied needed:
$Assem = (
"Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Sdk.Sfc",
"Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo",
"Microsoft.SqlServer.ConnectionInfo"
); Add-Type -AssemblyName $Assem;

The above assemblies are required in order to work since SQL Server SMO 2012 and greater. You can have limited use when connecting to SQL Servers version 2005, and possibly 2000.

Prepare connection parameters for Windows Systems

In Windows systems, we use ‘Integrated Authentication‘. But, here’s where things change a bit since SQL Server 2012 SMO. You will need to prepare the connection parameters, and set the *.UseIntegratedSecurity property to ‘true‘ (the default is ‘false‘). At the same time, you’ll need to set the password to ‘null’ in order to connect successfull.

## - Prepare connection strings and connect to a Windows SQL Server:
$SQLServerInstanceName = 'sqlsvrinst01,1439';
$SQLUserName = 'winUsername';
$SQLSrvConn = new-object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common.SqlConnectionInfo($SQLServerInstanceName, $SQLUserName, $null);
$SQLSrvConn.UseIntegratedSecurity = $true;
$SQLSrvObj = new-object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server($SQLSrvConn)

Now, you can query the PowerShell Object $SQLSrvObj.

## - Query PowerShell Object:
$SQLSrvObj.Information `
| Select-Object parent, platform, product, productlevel, `
OSVersion, Edition, version, HostPlatform, HostDistribution `
| Format-List;

Prepare connection parameters for Linux Systems

For Linux systems, we use ‘SQL Authentication’. Here we add the SQL User password, then passing the value to the SqlConnectionInfo class.  And, the *.UseIntegratedSecurity property by the default is ‘false‘.

## - Prepare connection strings and connect to a Linux SQL Server:
$SQLServerInstanceName = 'sqlsvrinst01,1439';
$SQLUserName = 'sqluser01'; $sqlPwd = '$usrpwd01!';
$SQLSrvConn = new-object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common.SqlConnectionInfo($SQLServerInstanceName, $SQLUserName, $SqlPwd)
$SQLSrvObj = new-object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server($SQLSrvConn)

Again, you can proceed to query the PowerShell Object $SQLSrvObj.

## - Query PowerShell Object:
$SQLSrvObj.Information `
| Select-Object parent, platform, product, productlevel, `
OSVersion, Edition, version, HostPlatform, HostDistribution `
| Format-List;

Please notice in the above image, the Windows 10 Insider Build 16215 Bash Console is running PowerShell Core. This list insider release made it possible for PowerShell Core to be functional again.

Conclusion

As we can see, this opens new opportunities to build cross-platform PowerShell scripts solutions working with SQL Servers in Linux, Windows, and others.

This is very exciting to start experiencing first hand these upcoming changes. I can’t deny that’s it’s challenging but you can’t turn down an opportunity to gain more skills.

Please, take advantage and subscribe to Microsoft Azure. Build, test, and start deploying solutions. Don’t be afraid to be creative. We all learn thru trial and errors!

This is a good time to keep up with what’s going on with technology.

Additional References:

Microsoft Azure: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/
Github: https://github.com/
Ubuntu: https://www.ubuntu.com/
Microsoft Windows Bash Shell: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/commandline/wsl/about
Microsoft Academy: https://mva.microsoft.com/
Microsoft Channel 9: https://channel9.msdn.com/
Microsoft MVP Blog: https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/mvpawardprogram/
Microsoft SQL Server Docs: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/sql-server/sql-server-technical-documentation
Microsoft PowerShell Blog: https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/powershell/