Available in the Microsoft Store – PowerShell Preview

Yes! If you haven’t noticed by now, PowerShell Preview is available for download from the Microsoft Store.
Just do a search for “PowerShell

It just takes less than a minute to install.

One thing you’ll miss from installing Powershell Preview using the MSI installation! That is, setting the additional options.

After the installation from the Microsoft Store, the PowerShell Preview application settings can be found under the Windows 10 Settings “Apps & features” section.

Then, click on the “Advanced options” to see additional information or make any changes to the application.

Now, the next time there’s an update to the PowerShell Preview, Windows 10 will take care of it automatically.

Happy PowerShelling!

Creating the PowerShell User Profile in Linux

In WSL, as on any Linux distribution, there’s no PowerShell User Profile file(“Microsoft.PowerShell_Profile.ps1“). So, it needs to be created manually.

Creating the profile folder

This profile is stored in the user home configuration folder “~/.config/powershell” folder.

But, the “powershell” folder doesn’t exist, it needs to be created in the configuration folder:

From the bash prompt, follow these steps:

1. Make sure you are in the user home folder:

pwd
cd /home/yourUserFolder

2. Verify the PowerShell folder doesn’t exist:

ls ~/.config

3. Change to the configuration folder:

cd ~/.config

3. Create the “powershell” folder, and assign permissions:

cd ~/.config
mkdir powershell
chmod 755
ll

Creating Microsoft.PowerShell_profile file

1. Using your Linux editor, create the Microsoft.PowerShell_Profile.ps1 file, and add code to the file: (Below using “vim” editor)

sudo vim /home/yourUserFolder/.config/powershell/Microsoft.PowerShell_profile.ps1
-> Write-Host "Welcome to PowerShell in Linux" -foreground 'Yellow';
-> Import-Module Microsoft.PowerShell.UnixCompleters
-> Import-UnixCompleters
-> Write-Host "UnixCompleters is loaded!" -foreground 'Yellow';

5. When done, save changes and exit “vim’ editor by typing:

:wq

Testing the PowerShell Profile

Open PowerShell and the “Welcome to PowerShell in Linux” with any other text will be displayed. At the same time, anything else in the profile will be executed.

Now, you can add more commands to the file when needed.

Keep on PowerShelling!

Getting Started – UnixCompleters Module for PowerShell in Linux

Yes! This module has been around for a while and it’s a great helper for completing bash commands in PowerShell.

Get it from the PowerShell Gallery: Microsoft.PowerShell.UnixCompleters

Installing the module

To install the UnixCompleted module manually execute the following command:

Install-Module -Name Microsoft.PowerShell.UnixCompleters

This module includes the following cmdlets:

Import-UnixCompleters
Remove-UnixCompleters
Set-UnixCompleter

Then, import the module by typing:

Import-Module Microsoft.PowerShell.UnixCompleters

Follow by running the cmdlet “Import-UnixCompleters” to load the module:

Import-UnixCompleters

Now, let’s use the ‘df‘ Linux command, which displays the amount of disk space available, to test this module:

df --

After typing the double-dash, press the tab key twice. The list of parameters will show at the bottom of the command.

Implementation

You can have this module to be loaded from your “PowerShell User Profile” which should be located in the user’s home configuration folder: /home/username/.config/powershell/Microsoft.PowerShell_profile.ps1. Remember! The “PowerShell User Profile” needs to be created manually.

Keep PowerShelling!!