Streamlining SQL Server Management Objects (SMO) In PowerShell 7 (Revised)

It’s been over two years since I touch this topic, so here’s an updated post about using SQL Server Management Object (SMO) on the latest PowerShell Version 7.

Here’s 411 on what’s out there!

For the most part, nowadays you can use SMO to  connect:

1. Windows to Linux.
2. Linux to Windows.
3. Windows to Linux Containers.
4. Linux to Linux Containers.
5. Windows to Windows Containers.
6. WSL to Linux Containers or Windows.

And, of course, will include cloud technologies.

Now, we have to extend our skills thanks to Docker Container.

*Note: Any connection issues connecting from Linux to Windows, can be solved by creating the inbound rule for Linux in Windows Firewall.

Ways to use SMO

There are two ways you could use SMO in PowerShell 7 (cross-platform):

1. Installing the SMO NuGet packages, two packages are requiered:
a. Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlManagementObjects Version 150.18208.0 (as of 03/23/2020)
b. Microsoft.Data.SqlClient Version 1.1.1 (recommended)

2. Installing the PowerShell Module: SqlServer Version 21.1.18221 (as of 03/23/2020)

Keep in mind, once the packages and/or modules are installed, you need to update them manually.

Working with SMO NuGet Packages

To install the Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlManagementObjects package. You first need to verify that Nuget Package Management is registered in PowerShell 7. Execute the following code will do the task of registration:

function Verify-NugetRegistered
{
[CmdletBinding()]
Param ()
# Microsoft provided code: Test Auto sAVCE
# Register NuGet package source, if needed
# The package source may not be available on some systems (e.g. Linux/Windows)
if (-not (Get-PackageSource | Where-Object{ $_.Name -eq 'Nuget' }))
{
Register-PackageSource -Name Nuget -ProviderName NuGet -Location https://www.nuget.org/api/v2
}
else
{
Write-Host "NuGet Already Exist! No Need to install." -ForegroundColor Yellow;
};
}; Verify-NugetRegistered;

Now, here’s the tricky part. There’s a known issue when executing the Install-Package cmdlet which will fail to install the package.

The workaround is to download the Nuget.exe CLI and place the executable in the following folder: “C:\Program Files\PackageManagement\NuGet\Packages.”

This is the PowerShell default path for storing Packages, and it may not exist in the beginning. So you may need to manually create the folders.

To install the SMO packages needed, execute the following command in PowerShell 7 prompt as an Admin:

cd 'C:\Program Files\PackageManagement\NuGet\Packages\'
./nuget install Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlManagementObjects -version 150.18208.0
Pause
./nuget install Microsoft.Data.SqlClient -version 1.1.1
Pause

Notice, I included the versions of the packages as of 3/23/2020. These SMO packages will support SQL Server 2019 or older, but keeping in mind the older the SQL Server version the latest features will not apply.

Also, these packages doesn’t contain any PowerShell cmdlets, they are meant for developing solution from scratch. For example, below I’m creating an SMO script to connect to a SQL Server providing my SQL authentication, query to get the SQL Server engine version, and manipulate the results from the script.

## - PowerShell 7 loading .NET Core netstandard 2.0 library SMO dll's:
$smopath = Join-Path ((Get-Package Microsoft.SqlServer.SqlManagementObjects).Source `
| Split-Path) (Join-Path lib netstandard2.0);

Add-Type -Path (Join-Path $smopath Microsoft.SqlServer.Smo.dll);
Add-Type -Path (Join-Path $smopath Microsoft.SqlServer.ConnectionInfo.dll);
Add-Type -Path (Join-Path $smopath Microsoft.SqlServer.SmoExtended.dll);
Add-Type -Path (Join-Path $smopath Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Sdk.Sfc.dll);

## - Prepare login credentials:
$SQLServerInstanceName = 'sapien01,1449';
$SQLUserName = 'sa'; $SqlPwd = '$SqlPwd01!';

## - Prepare connection to SQL Server:
$SQLSrvConn = `
new-object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common.SqlConnectionInfo($SQLServerInstanceName, $SQLUserName, $SqlPwd);
$SQLSrvObj = new-object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server($SQLSrvConn);

## - Sample T-SQL Queries:
$SqlQuery = 'Select @@Version as FullVersion';

## - Execute T-SQL Query:
[array]$result = $SQLSrvObj.Databases['master'].ExecuteWithResults($SqlQuery);
$GetVersion = $result.tables.Rows;
$GetVersion.FullVersion.Split(' - ')[0];

## - SMO Get SQL Server Info:
$SQLSrvObj.Information `
| Select-Object parent, platform, `
@{ label = 'FullVersion'; Expression = { $GetVersion.FullVersion.Split(' - ')[0]; } }, `
OSVersion, Edition, version, HostPlatform, HostDistribution `
| Format-List;

The best thing! This Package is supported cross-platform so you can execute the script on any OS.

The beauty of coding with SMO is that everything is documented. Just check the Microsoft Documentation “SQL Server Management Objects (SMO) Programming Guide“.

Working with SqlServer Module

Now, using the SQL Server Module in PowerShell 7 is makes it a bit simple to install. And, it’s supported cross-platform.

Just execute the following command as an Admin:

Install-Module -Name SqlServer -AllowClobber

The latest version contains a total of 66 commands you can use to manage your SQL Server engine.

Now, besides having all of these commands available, in the future, you may have the need to create custom functions.

Here’s the variation of the previous SMO script sample:

## - Import the SqlServer module which it loads all needed SMO assemblies:
Import-Module SqlServer

## - Prepare login credentials:
$SQLServerInstanceName = 'sapien01,1449';
$SQLUserName = 'sa'; $SqlPwd = '$SqlPwd01!';

## - Prepare connection to SQL Server:
$SQLSrvConn = `
new-object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Common.SqlConnectionInfo($SQLServerInstanceName, $SQLUserName, $SqlPwd);
$SQLSrvObj = new-object Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server($SQLSrvConn);

## - Sample T-SQL Queries:
$SqlQuery = 'Select @@Version as FullVersion';

## - Execute T-SQL Query:
[array]$result = $SQLSrvObj.Databases['master'].ExecuteWithResults($SqlQuery);
$GetVersion = $result.tables.Rows;
$GetVersion.FullVersion.Split(' - ')[0];

## - SMO Get SQL Server Info:
$SQLSrvObj.Information `
| Select-Object parent, platform, `
@{ label = 'FullVersion'; Expression = { $GetVersion.FullVersion.Split(' - ')[0]; } }, `
OSVersion, Edition, version, HostPlatform, HostDistribution `
| Format-List;

The differences is quite simple. All SMO assemblies are previously loaded when you import the SqlServer module. So, you don’t have to worry about including the assemblies in the code. Make sure to check all of the commands available that can help you manage the SQL Server.

Additional Tools Available

Now, don’t forget to check other SQL Server community tools that are available, such as:
1. DBATools – SQL SMO PowerShell.
2. MSSql-Scripter – Python-based tool.
3. Mssql-cli – Python-based tool.

And, don’t forget to check out .NET Interactive which brings Jupyter Notebook with PowerShell kernel.

If you want to try .NET Notebook, I suggest to first install Anaconda (Python 3.7) which makes it simple to use in Windows.

If you want to experiment with .NET Notebook without installing anything in your system, then try MyBinder. This is a web-based .NET Notebook that’s run from a container.

Unfortunately, in this scenario, only the PowerShell 7 core modules are available. But at least you will be able to learn the essentials of .NET Notebook.

Go ahead and start using this Amazing technology!

My Truth with WSL 2 in Windows 10

I’ve seen many blog posts looking for specific information on setting up WSL 2 in Windows 10 and especially, on a virtual machine. But, I always end up a little short and figuring out by myself through trial-and-error.

Microsoft WSL 2 Installation documentation page is helpful for most part. But was meant for a physical installation. ()

Let me shared what I found and hope it serves you well.

My Experience

First, I love WSL (Windows Subsystem for Linux)! It’s a great addition to Windows 10, and everyone should learn how to use it.

To get started, follow the instructions on how to get your WSL 1 Linux Distro installed. And, begin with installing Ubuntu 18.04.

Now, get Docker Desktop (), which can be installed in Windows 10 RTM Build 18363 with WSL 1. For the most part, you can start working with docker containers.

To use WSL 2 with Docker Tech Preview, you need Windows 10 Insider build 18917 (or higher). Execute the following command in either DOS or PowerShell console:

wsl -l -v

If it doesn’t work, then it means you still using WSL 1, and it can’t be set to WSL 2. This might be due to the OS is not a Windows Insider version. In WSL 1, the version ‘-v’ parameter is only available for Windows Insider OS.

Now, If it works, then you’ll get the following response:

prompt, use the following command to change from WSL 1 to WSL 2:

wsl --set-default-version Ubuntu-18.04 2

wsl -l -v

if you still can’t set the WSL distro to version 2, it means you’re not using Windows Insider build.

WSL 2 in Virtual Machine

You need to build a virtual machine with the latest Windows 10 Insider build. If you have tried the previous instructions and didn’t work, then to fix the issue run the PowerShell cmdlet on the Hyper-V host (outside the VM):

Set-VMProcessor -VMName [HyperV-VMName] -ExposeVirtualizationExtensions $true

You can use the Get-VMProcessor cmdlet to verify the changes made to the property “ExposeVirtualizationExtensions.” In this case, should show the value change to “True” as shown below:

Get-VMProcessor -VMName [HyperV-VMName] | Format-List

Make sure the virtual machine is restart after making the changes.

What about setting up WSL 2 on an Azure virtual machine? WSL 2 can’t be set up in an Azure virtual machine. You don’t have access to the Azure parent Hyper-V host to use the Set-VMProcessor cmdlet.

Although the Set-VMProcessor cmdlet is not mentioned in the main WSL 2 installation page, you’ll find it hidden in the WSL 2 FAQ page ().

Remember, this cmdlet is very important if you want to set up WSL 2 on a virtual machine in your physical Hyper-V Host.

The Good Stuff – Docker Desktop WSL 2 Tech Preview

First, make sure all of the above settings are in place. This means that you were able to set WSL 2 as the “Default Version” on your favorite Linux Distro.

Open your favorite console, PowerShell, then verify WSL 2 is set by executing the following command:

wsl -l -v

Then, follow the instructions to install the Docker WSL 2 Tech Preview – “Docker Desktop WSL 2 backend“:

At the time of this post, the download Docker Desktop Edge version should be 2.1.7.0.

Note: If you’re on version 2.1.6.0, upgrading to 2.1.7.0, will fail to start. Ignore it! Then, proceed to “Install Update” to complete installation and reboot.

 

Configure Docker for WSL 2

Although Docker is running in the background, you still need to complete configuring Docker to work in WSL 2.

Continue to follow the instruction from the “Docker Desktop WSL 2 backend – Install” section, and you’re done.

Failure to properly configure Docker to WSL 2, you’ll get the following error:

Now, you can start building and working with Docker containers in WSL 2.

Have fun!

PowerShell 7 Release Candidate Is Here!!

The moment everyone has been waiting for some time is here, PowerShell Release Candidate is available for download. This a “Go Live” release officially supported in production by Microsoft.

Everyone in the Microsoft PowerShell Team, with the help of the community, has done an excellent job with the evolution of this new version of PowerShell. Read all about it on the PowerShell DevBlogs recent post “Announcing the PowerShell 7.0 Release Candidate“.

Make sure to read all previous posts as they perfectly outlined under the “Why is PowerShell 7 so awesome?” section of the release candidate post.

Also, it’s not a bad idea to download the recent .NET 3.1 SDK and check out the updated Docker Core SDK Images.

And, have you try:

1. Windows Terminal – Access all of your Windows Shells from one application.

2. Docker Tech Preview – Get the latest Docker Tech Preview for WSL 2.

3. Out-Gridview – Specially developed to work in PowerShell 7 non-Windows, as well as in Windows OS. (Module: Microsoft.PowerShell.GraphicalTools – PowerShell Gallery)

This is just a few items to keep in mind. It will help you to be a productive DevOps and System Administrator.

At Coders Cafe: PowerShell – Introduction to SQL Server Containers

I’ll be presenting at the South Florida .NET User Group Coders Cafe on Tuesday, August 8th, 6:30 PM. Location: Cendyn Spaces, Boca Raton.

Topic: PowerShell – Introduction to SQL Server Containers

Description: This session will be covering the basic of working with Containers and PowerShell Core. We’ll be taking the steps of creating a SQL Server 2019 container in an Ubuntu 18.04 Linux system. Then, will be using PowerShell Core to connect to the SQL Server containers to extract information.

  

Interested in attending this session, click here to register.

PowerShell Core – Working with Persistent Disk Storage in Docker Containers

This quick blog post will hope to give you a heads up in how to work with container(s) disk data. It’s a known fact that container(s) storing data will not persist if the container is removed. Yes! If you build a container to store your data, it will be gone.

Containers are perfectly suited for testing, meant to fast deployment of a solution, and can be easily deployed to the cloud. It’s cost effective!

Very important to understand! Containers disk data only exist while the container is running. If the container is removed, that data is gone.

So, you got to find the way to properly configure your container environment to make the data persist on disk.

Persisting Data

There are *two quick way to persist data when working with container(s):

1. Create a docker volume.
2. Or, use a local machine folder area.

*Note: There are other solution to help with persisting data for containers, but this a good starting point.

I’m using the docker command line for now. Later, I will be creating some blog post about using Docker Compose and Kubernetes.

I love to use PowerShell Core with Docker command line!

Docker Create Volume

Using docker command “docker volume create <nameofvolume>” will create the volume to help persist data on your local machine.

docker volume create MyLinuxData

Use the following docker commands to check your newly created volume:

* To list all existing docker volume(s):

docker volume ls

* To check “inspect” a docker volume(s) to provide detail information:

docker volume inspect MyLinuxData

Using the “docker volume inspect <VolumeName>.” command line, it will show the volume mount location:

“Mountpoint”: “/var/lib/docker/volumes/MyLinuxData/_data”,

In this case, the mount location is on the Linux box under the Docker Volumes folder. This means all data can persist on you local machine.

Local Machine Folder

This option seems straight forward as there’s no need to create a Docker Volume. Just use the ‘-v’ switch in the Docker Run command line.

In the following command line I’m activating the Docker container with previously configured Microsoft SQL Server instance. I include the ‘-v’ switch to mount a folder on my local machine.

docker run -p 1455:1455 -v /home/maxt/TempSQLBackups:/home/TempSQLBackups --name sql2k19ctp23_v02 -d sql2k19_ctp2.3_sandbox:CTP2.3-Version02

Notice in this case, to verify that my SQL Server container has mount to my the local machine folder, I can execute the following command:

docker exec -i sql2k19ctp23_v02 ls /home/TempSQLBackups

Using “docker exec -i <containerid/name> ls <containerfolderlocation” will display the results of all the files back to the screen. Now, anything you add to that local folder will be accessible to the container.

Summary

This is a good starting point when learning how to work with Docker data in containers. You’ll still go thru trails-and-errors while learning how to build container images, and make data persist for your application. But, it’s much faster and easier to rebuild images. This is one of a most to learn technology.

References

Check out the following blog post as it help me understand about “Persistent Storage”:

PowerShell Core – Updating your SQL Server Linux Docker Containers Images

In this post I’ll be covering how to install some needed components, how to commit the changes, and create a revised images for deployment.

In recent event and meetings, I’ve been talking about how to work SQL Server Linux Containers Docker images. As these images get your container up-and-running quickly they lacks some tools that may be useful to complete the SQL Server configuration.

What’s missing?

The SQL Server images contains a small footprint of Linux Ubuntu 16.04 Operating System (OS) and is meant for quick deployment. The OS side the container need to be kept updated regularly.

At the same time, when you starts exploring inside the container, there still missing components you may want to use:

  • vim – for editing text files.
  • ifconfig – to check your network interfaces.
  • ping – to check IP-Address can be reachable across the network.
  • curl – for transfering data.

So, after you pull the docker image, create the container using “docker run …“, and then get to the container Bash session by using “docker exec -it …“. Remember the bash session only get you to the “root” level as there’s no users set on these containers.

## - First time setup: (for "server:2019-CTP2.2-ubuntu" and )
docker run -e 'ACCEPT_EULA=Y' -e 'SA_PASSWORD=$SqlPwd01A' -e "MSSQL_PID=Developer" -p 1433:1433 --name sql2k19_CTP2.3 -d mcr.microsoft.com/mssql/server:2019-CTP2.3-ubuntu;

## - Display all active containers;
docker ps -a

At this point make sure the active container status should be in “Up” status. Now can proceed to update the container.

Installing Missing Components

To have access to the container we use the “docker exec …” command.  This command will allow to get access to the container “root” prompt.

## - Configuring your container:
docker exec -it sql2k19_CTP2.3 bash

The first thing I would suggest to do, execute the following to commands:

## - Updating OS:
apt update

apt upgrade

Notice if you try to execute: vim, ping, ifconfig, and curl are not installed in the container images.

Let’s proceed to install these component by executing the following command:

## - Installing additional components:
apt-get -y install \
curl \
vim \
iputils-ping \
net-tools \
powershell-preview

Also, it’s a good idea to create a Downloads folder in case to install other application(s).

## - Create Downloads folder in root:
mkdir Downloads
chmod 755 Downloads

Notice that PowerShell Core Preview was included with the other missing components.  PowerShell has become a great tool to have in a Linux environment.

PowerShell Core SQLServer Module

Although, this is optional but it doesn’t prevent you to include PowerShell Core Preview 6.2.0-RC1 with the SqlServer module which included the “Invoke-Sqlcmd” use by many administrator.  This is a great module to have in a SQL Server container image.

So, from the “root” prompt in the container open PowerShell Core Preview, then proceed to install the SqlServer module preview version 21.1.18095.

## - Open PowerShell Core:
pwsh-preview

## - Install SqlServer module preview:
Install-Module SQLServer -AllowPreRelease

This completes the essential for using PowerShell to help managing a SQL Server instance(s).

How About Anaconda?

We could install the latest version of Anaconda with Python 3.7 in our SQL Server container image.

## - Change directory to Downloads folder:
cd Downloads

## - Download Anaconda with Python 3.7:
wget https://repo.anaconda.com/archive/Anaconda3-2018.12-Linux-x86_64.sh

## - Install Anaconda with Python 3.7:
bash Anaconda3-2018.12-Linux-x86_64.sh

This will give us the ability to test Python scripts within the container.

Testing installed Components

We need to verify that all previously installed components are working. Go back to the container “root” prompt, and to execute the commands:

ifconfig
ping 127.0.0.1
vim ~/.bashrc
pwsh
sqlcmd

Now, executing “sqlcmd” command line will not work unless you add the path to the executable to the “root” ~/.bashrc file:

## - Need to include the path to SQLCMD command:
echo 'export PATH="$PATH:/opt/mssql-tools/bin"' >> ~/.bashrc

## - Refresh ~/.bashrc:
source ~/.bashrc

## - Run Sqlcmd command:
sqlcmd -L localhost -U sa -P 'sapwd'
> select @@version
> go
> exit

This is a good indication that our *SQL Server container is active. And, now we got all missing components installed.

Now, we need to make sure we don’t lose out changes.

Creating your own SQL Server Docker image

This is an important step so you won’t lose the changes already made to the container.  Below are the brief step to follow:

## - Commit the container changes: (repository name must be lowercase but Tags are OK with uppercase)
## -> docker commit "<Get-Container_ID>" "<Image-name>":"<TAG name>"

docker commit "<Get-Container_ID>" sql2k19_ctp2.3_sandbox:CTP2.3-Version01

## - List images included the committed ones:
docker images

## - Stop Image before the Save step:
docker stop sql2k19_CTP2.3
docker ps -a

## - Save docker updated image:
docker save -o ./Downloads/sql2k19ctp23_sandboxVer01.tar sql2k19_ctp2.3_sandbox

The “docker commit …” command, you’ll provide both the image-name (all lowercase) and a TAG name (uppercase allowed). You can be creative in having an naming conversion for you images repositories.

It’s very important to save images after doing the commit. I found out that having an active container would be useless without an image.  As far as I know, I haven’t found a way to rebuild an image from an existing container if the image was previously removed.

Summary

Hope this brief run down on working with SQL Server Docker container images will get you started with modifying existing images for quick deployment.

One thing to keep in mind!

  • The SQL Server Container memory need to be 4GB minimum.
  • In Windows, if your’re using non-Hyper-V virtualization tools such as Virtualbox, the virtual machine memory need to be change to 4GB.
  • Also, when you are creating images, the virtual machine disk size default is 20GB. This may need to be increase unless you keep cleaning/removing images to make room.

Just layout what you need, commit, save and deploy your docker solution in your environment.

Keep learning about this amazing technology!

 

PowerShell – Docker Setup for Windows 10 WSL Ubuntu 18.04 with VMware Workstation

The purpose of this blog post is to show how to setup Docker Community Edition in a Windows 10 with VMware Workstation to be use in Windows Subsystem for Windows (WSL).

There are a few blog post that helped me figure out what’s needed to get this to work and I’ll be sharing these links at the end of this post.

My current environment

My current environment consist of the following components:

  • Windows 10 Build 17763
  • VMware Workstation Pro 12
  • *Oracle Virtualbox 5.2
  • WSL – Ubuntu 18.04
  • SQL Server 2017 Developer Edition
  • Windows PowerShell (v5.1.17763.316)
  • PowerShell Core GA v6.3.1 (both Windows and Linux)
  • PowerShell Core Preview v6.2.0-preview.4 (both Windows and Linux)

*Note: This is not the latest version  of Virtualbox but it’s still supported.

Remember, the purpose of this environment is to build a “developer sandbox” that can allow me to learn and work with Docker containers.

What’s needed!

Because I’m using VMware Workstation instead of Hyper-V, there are a few things need to be in place to make this work. Windows 10 need to have the following:

  • All Hyper-V services need to be disable by using “System Configuration” tool.

  •  Install VMWare Workstation Pro. (https://www.vmware.com/products/workstation-pro.html)
  •  Install Oracle Virtualbox version 5.2. (https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Download_Old_Builds_5_2)

  •  Install from the Microsoft Store, WSL – Ubuntu 18.04.

  • And, make sure to run “sudo apt update” and “sudo apt upgrade” because images are not updated with latest components.

Installing PowerShell Components

Next, the following Docker components packages from Chocolatey need to be install using Windows PowerShell with administrator privileges:

* Install docker

choco install -y docker

* Install docker-machine-vmwareworkstation

choco install -y docker-machine-vmwareworkstation

Getting WSL Ready for Docker

Now, open the “WSL – Ubuntu 18.04” Linux console and execute the following *commands:

sudo apt update

sudo apt upgrade

*Note: You’ll need to run these two commands manually to keep your Linux distribution up-to-date.

At this point, follow the Docker installation instructions for “Docker-CE for Ubuntu 18.04“. But, in a nutshell, here’s the shortcut:

sudo apt-get install \
apt-transport-https \
ca-certificates \
curl \
gnupg-agent \
software-properties-common

curl -fsSL https://download.docker.com/linux/ubuntu/gpg | sudo apt-key add -

sudo add-apt-repository \
"deb [arch=amd64] https://download.docker.com/linux/ubuntu \
$(lsb_release -cs) \
stable"

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt install docker-ce

sudo usermod -aG docker maxt

exit

At this point. make sure to reopen the WSL linux console.

Setup Docker-Machine in Windows

Back in Windows PowerShell, the next steps show the way to have Docker work in “WSL – Ubuntu 18.04“. Starting with Windows PowerShell console, execute the following commands:

docker-machine --native-ssh create -d vmwareworkstation default
docker-machine create docker-host

These commands should complete without any errors. At the same time, two virtual machines: “default” and “docker-host” will be created and running in *Virtualbox.

*Note: These two *NEED* to be running in order for docker to work with WSL. At the same time, both VMware Workstation and Virtualbox need to be installed or this will not work

To check that for the Docker-Machine environment(s) are working, use the following command:

docker-machine ls

Next, execute the following command to write down “docker-host” environment results to be copied into the Linux user ~/.bashrc file.

docker-machine env docker-host
PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> docker-machine.exe env default
$Env:DOCKER_TLS_VERIFY = "1"
$Env:DOCKER_HOST = "tcp://192.168.220.xxx:2376"
$Env:DOCKER_CERT_PATH = "C:\Users\max_t\.docker\machine\machines\default"
$Env:DOCKER_MACHINE_NAME = "default"
$Env:COMPOSE_CONVERT_WINDOWS_PATHS = "true"
# Run this command to configure your shell:
# & "C:\ProgramData\chocolatey\lib\docker-machine\bin\docker-machine.exe" env default | Invoke-Expression

Open a “WSL – Ubuntu 18.04 console to edit the user “~/.bashrc” file, to add the following Docker variables:

## Added manually for Docker machine docker-host:
export DOCKER_HOST=192.168.99.xxx:2376
export DOCKER_TLS_VERIFY=1
export DOCKER_CERT_PATH=/mnt/c/users/max_t/.docker/machine/machines/docker-host
export DOCKER_MACHINE_NAME=docker-host
export COMPOSE_CONVERT_WINDOWS_PATHS=true

sudo vim ~/.bashrc

Reopen the “WSL – Ubuntu 18.04 console.

Testing Docker in WSL

Now, I can test Docker in my “WSL – Ubuntu 18.04 console session. Open PowerShell Core console, and execute the following command to run the Docker Hello-World demo:

docker run Hello-World

This command download (or pull) the Docker image, then run the Hello-World container. If everything work as expected, then it will display the following text.

To check both Docker image(s) and/or container(s) in WSL , use the following commands: (Picture

# - Check for all pulled images in system:
docker images

# - Check the status of active containers:
docker ps -a

As you can see there no issues executing Docker command lines in Linux PowerShell Core.

To see the full list of docker command line help available click on the following link.

After all this is done! Docker working in my WSL environment.

Limitations

YES! There are limitations. This is a workaround on the issue of using Docker without Hyper-V. And, this will allow you to:

  • Pull images
  • Update containers
  • Save images

In my environment, I found limitations working with Docker Network using WSL which can impact Windows Docker-Machine VM “docker-host” interface. This issue can force you to rebuild both VM interfaces: “default” and “docker-host“.

Make sure to learn how to commit, save, and reload Docker images.  Don’t lose your changes!

So, if you have either VMware Workstation and/or Oracle Virtualbox, consider investing the time creating a Linux virtual machine and then install Docker CE.

Summary

We have accomplished setting up Docker containers in *Windows 10 “WSL – Ubuntu 18.04” using both Windows PowerShell and PowerShell Core in Linux. So, using Oracle Virtualbox v5.2 with VMware Workstation is a required component to make this work.

*Note: These post is meant for people to make Docker work in WSL Linux.

Also, if you’re familiar with PowerShell, Docker commands can execute without any issues. Now, I can use my favorite editor SAPIEN’s PowerShell Studio to build my automation scripts with docker commands.

What’s Next?

Try downloading other Docker images, like SQL Server 2017 and SQL Server 2019. This is the quickest way for providing a built solution using containers.

Learn about Docker Compose, and Kubernetes as these can be use in the Cloud environment as well.

Go and Explores the possibilities of provisioning solutions to your organization!

Resource links