Issues with VS Code “PowerShell Integrated” feature

As VS Code continues to evolve, we need to keep in mind that technology keep changing fast. Some of us on Windows Insider Fast Ring get the opportunity to test drive the latest build of Windows 10.

But there are times when these upgrades with break something in one of our installed applications. Just don’t despair, as there’s always a workaround!

In the last Windows Insider Build 16193, did break in VS Code (and the VS Code Insider) editor as their new feature “PowerShell Integrated” won’t work. Microsoft knows about it an it will be fix down the line. This issue will impact both Windows PowerShell, and PowerShell Core.

This issue is only on Windows 10 Build 16193 including WSL (Windows 10 Bash), and will be corrected soon.  In Windows 10 Bash console, PowerShell Core will get hung!

But, don’t worry! If you installed Ubuntu Desktop in Windows 10 Bash, then you can use PowerShell without any issues.

VS Code Workaround for “PowerShell Integrated”

If you want some information about this issue, feel free to checkout the following *link:

*Note: Thanks to David Wilson ( for providing the workaround for VS Code.

In the link above, you’ll find the workaround to fix the issue. Basically, is creating the profile for VS Code (“Microsoft.VSCode_profile.ps1“) and adding the following line:

File: Microsoft.VSCode_profile.ps1
[System.Console]::OutputEncoding = [System.Text.Encoding]::ASCII
Write-Host “PowerShell version X.x.x loaded”

Where are these VS Code profile files been stored at in Windows?

Keep in mind. These profile files you need to create them at the following locations:

1. For Windows PowerShell – C:\Users\mtrinidad\Documents\WindowsPowerShell

2. For PowerShell Core – C:\Users\mtrinidad\Documents\PowerShell

3. In Linux, for standard profile.ps1 file – /opt/microsoft/powershell/6.0.0-beta.1 

In order for the profile to be use in VS Code, we need to add the following line in the “setting.json” file: “powershell.enableProfileLoading”: true

What other PowerShell tools you can use in VS Code?

Use “Code Runner” extension.  Then, from the menu look for “Preferences | Settings” which will open the “settings.json” you can configure which PowerShell version you want to use with the following lines:

1. For Windows PowerShell use:
“powershell”: “powershell.exe -ExecutionPolicy ByPass -File”,

2. For PowerShell Core:
“powershell”: “\”C:\\Program Files\\PowerShell\\6.0.0-beta.1\\powershell.exe\” -ExecutionPolicy ByPass -File”,

To execute a PowerShell script using Code Runner extension, just right-click and select “Run Code“. Then, all PowerShell results will be display under the “Output” section.

Changing “PowerShell Integrated” Terminal behavior

The normal behaviour when using the “PowerShell Integrated” is that you can highlight a few lines or execute the whole script and the results will be display in the “Terminal” section.

So, Yes! You can change the Terminal Integrated behavior to run other type of console: Bash, DOS, and even PowerShell version X as a standalone host. Just look at under the Settings Preferences “Settings.json” file by copy/paste the following line:

  • For Dos – “”: “cmd.exe”,
  • For PowerShell Core – “”: “C:\\Program Files\\PowerShell\\6.0.0-beta.1\\powershell.exe”,
  • For Windows PowerShell – “”: “powershell.exe”,
  • For Linux Bash – “”: “bash”,
  • For Linux powershell – “”: “powershell”,

Sample image “Settings.json”:

Go ahead! Give it a try and experiment.

Check Out Github

If you’re interested in contributing, providing feedback and helping with the development of PowerShell Core, don’t forget to check out Github:

Always remember!
* For issues, bugs, and feedbacks with Windows PowerShell, use the following link at “Windows PowerShell UserVoice“:

* For issues, bugs, and feedbacks with PowerShell Core, use Github:

PowerShell, and SQL Server Working with Anaconda

On my previous blog “PowerShell – Working with Python and SQL Server“, I show how to install Python 3.5 so we can be build python scripts to connecting to SQL Server and use them with PowerShell.

Now, since the release of SQL Server 2017 and the integration of Anaconda (ie. Python 3.6), we need to know what it takes to successfully install Anaconda on your developer system(s) both Windows and Linux.

Installing Anaconda in Windows

In Windows the installation is simply done through the SQL Server 2017 setup process. During the SQL Server installation process, select the “Machine Learning Services (In-Database)” option and this will automatically install both “R” and *”Anaconda” on your system.

*Note: Installing Anaconda (Python 3.6) will redirect any previous version of Python to version 3.6. So, you may need to manually revert back to use older version.

Installing Anaconda in Linux (Ubuntu)

There are few more steps to complete the installation on *Linux. First, verify which is the latest version available by going to the following link:

Then follow these steps in bash console:

1. Change directory to where you want to store the installation file:

$ cd Downloads

2. The “curl” command for the latest version available:

$ curl -O

3. Run the installation command:

$ bash

4. Enter “Yes” to Accept the license agreement.

6. Then, you can select the location where Anaconda will be installed. The default is the user home folder.

5. Add the Anacona path to user profile in the “.bashrc” file by answering “Yes” and this will force to open Python on version 3.6.

6. Finally, to activate Anaconda, type the following command:

$ source ~/.bashrc

If you want to use any previous version, then you’ll need to manually type the PythonX.x executable. Try the following commands to open other versions of python previously installed in Ubuntu: python3.5, python2, or python2.7.

*Note: These steps can be applied to WSL Windows 10 Bash.

Using “update-alternatives” Linux Command

You could also setup the “update alternatives” command to swapt between the different versions of Python. This command need to be executed under super-user privilege “sudo su“.

Below is the series of commands use with “update-alternatives“:

##-> Install python for 'update-alternatives' command use:
$ sudo su
# update-alternatives --list python # will not display python

##-> To setup to use different versions:
# update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/python python /usr/bin/python2.7 5
# update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/python python /usr/bin/python3.5 1
# update-alternatives --install /usr/bin/python python /home/Username/anaconda3/bin/python3.6 2

##-> To list all installed pythons:
# update-alternatives --list python

##-> To change Python version, then select which version
# update-alternatives --config python

##-> You can use the --remove parameter to get rid of any lines added:
# update-alternatives --remove python /usr/bin/python3.5

Remember, in Ubuntu Linux, the system default version of Python is 2.7.

It would be a bad routine, when using the “update-alternatives” command, to change back to the default version as all running scripts during the system updates will need run on Python 2.7.

Additional Package for SQL Server

During the Anaconda installation, you’ll notice that it will load lots of python packages for data science and including “tk” which provide the ability to create GUI applications.

But, there’s one package missing, “pyodbc” will be needed in order to create python scripts to connect with SQL Server.

I did install PYODBC in both Windows and Linux, run the following command at the console:

conda install pyodbc

Then, to test this package was loaded, open *python and type:

import pyodbc
## - Connect to database:
cnxn = pyodbc.connect('DRIVER={ODBC Driver 13 for SQL Server};SERVER=MTRINIDADLT2,51417;DATABASE=master;UID=sa;PWD=$SqlPwd01!')
cursor = cnxn.cursor()

Unfortunately, in Ubuntu Linux, the connection string will fail giving the following error:

cnxn = pyodbc.connect('DRIVER={ODBC Driver 13 for SQL Server};SERVER=MTRINIDADLT2,51417;DATABASE=master;UID=sa;PWD=$SqlPwd01!')
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "", line 1, in
pyodbc.Error: ('01000', "[01000] [unixODBC][Driver Manager]Can't open lib '/opt/microsoft/msodbcsql/lib64/' : file not found (0) (SQLDriverConnect)")

Strangely enough, this error is only on Ubuntu Linux and not Windows installation. So, Python 3.6 will work on Windows to build your scripts to work with SQL Server while Microsoft and/or Anaconda figured this one out.

*Note: This sample connection string to SQL Server is done thru SQL Server Authentication.

Configuring Anaconda in SQL Server 2017

This is only available in SQL Server 2017 and SQL Server Management Studio v17 with the feature of integrating Anaconda (Python 3.6) with SQL Server is to be able to execute the python script(s) from SQL Server Stored-Procedure.

The following steps need to be complete to enable SQL Server to execute Python scripts as an external script from SSMS SQL Query or within a stored-procedure.

1. Execute the following T-SQL command:

sp_configure 'external scripts enabled', 1

2. Then, SQL Server Service will need to be restarted for the changes to take place.

3. Proceed to execute a python script from SSMS SQL Query panel:

execute sp_execute_external_script
@language = N'python',
@script = N'
import sys
print("Hello SQLServer, I am Python Version:")

Unfortunately, I haven’t been successful to run the SSMS SQL query connected to a SQL Server on Linux. So, apparently there’s still a limitation in Linux.

What with PowerShell!

So the main purpose of integrating Anaconda (Python 3.6) with SQL Server is to be able to execute the script from SQL Server Stored-Procedure. But, one of Anaconda installed packages is ‘tk‘.

The ‘tk‘ package allows you to create GUI application in Python. This opens opens opportunities to develope and integrating some solution with PowerShell. For example, PowerShell v6 Alpha doesn’t have the Out-GridView command available yet.

So, here’s a raw with limited functionality of a python Out-GridView look-a-like. The following sample code will access some data from SQL Server, use PowerShell to manipulate the information, and then use Python ‘tk’ component to display it in a GUI datagrid.

$runpy = @'
import pyodbc
from tkinter import *

cnxn = pyodbc.connect('DRIVER={ODBC Driver 13 for SQL Server};SERVER=MTRINIDADLT2,1738;DATABASE=master;UID=sa;PWD=$Adm1n!')
cursor = cnxn.cursor()

#Execute T-SQL Query:
trecord = []
tsql = 'SELECT Name, Location, Hire, HireDate FROM SampleDB1.dbo.HolidayEmployees;'
if cursor.execute(tsql):
row = cursor.fetchone()
while row:
datarow = [str(row[0]),str(row[1]),str(row[2]),str(row[3])]
row = cursor.fetchone()

## - list to screen list of data and will get number of rows in the list:
i = 0;
for i, rec in enumerate(trecord):

for i, rec in enumerate(trecord):
col = 0;
for c in rec:
Label(text=c, relief=RIDGE, width=15).grid(row=i, column=col)
col = col + 1;


python -c $runpy;

As you can image, there’s a lot of room to grow for integrating technologies such as PowerShell and Python. Just be creative!

Additional Tips

1. To edit, or commented out, the Anaconda Path, in the .bashrc file:

$ sudo gedit ~/.bashrc


2. To find out all installed packages in Anaconda, use the following command:

$ conda list

3. Upgrading Anaconda to newer version:

## - Windows:
conda update --prefix 'C:\Program Files\Anaconda3' anaconda
## - Linux:
$ conda update anaconda

Additional Resources

* Don’t forget to check out Microsoft Data Amp Technical Sessions at:
* Check What’s new about SQL Server 2017?
* Getting started in SQL Server on Linux:
* Download Anaconda: