PSCore6 – Export-CSV cmdlet difference

Yes! There’s a change, and is a good one. While checking out some recent blog post on Export-Csv command, I took it a little further. And, I ended up finding that the parameters have change in this cmdlet.

Difference

Export-Csv – Windows Powershell parameter names:

((Get-help Export-Csv).Parameters).parameter.name
Append
Confirm
Delimiter
Encoding
Force
InputObject
LiteralPath
NoClobber
NoTypeInformation
Path
UseCulture
WhatIf

Export-Csv – PowerShell Core parameter names:

((Get-help Export-Csv).Parameters).parameter.name
Append
Confirm
Delimiter
Encoding
Force
IncludeTypeInformation
InputObject
LiteralPath
NoClobber
NoTypeInformation
Path
UseCulture
WhatIf

Notice in PowerShell Core, there’s a new parameter: “-IncludeTypeInformation“.

Our prayer answered!

For a long time, in Windows PowerShell, we had to add the parameter “-NoTypeInformation“, so the “#TYPE …” line on the first row of the *CSV would not be included.

So, in Windows PowerShell executing the command without the “-NoTypeInformation” parameter, will produce the following result:

Now, using the same command in PowerShell Core without the “-NoTypeInformation” parameter, will produce a different result:

Moving forward with PowerShell, there’s no need to include the “-NoTypeInformation” parameter. Apparently, seems like the “-NoTypeInformation” parameter is the default when is not use in the cmdlet. So, no changes are needed to any previous developed scripts.

Clean Data

There is one thing we’ve learn thru time, is to always provide clean data. Knowing that a *CSV file is a text data set with columns and rows, always provide the columns name(s). This way the data structure looks nice and well defined.

Here’s just an example of how to manually create a one column list: (PowerShell Core)

## - First add the column name, then add the rows:
'ServerName' | Out-File -LiteralPath c:\Temp\MyServerList.csv;
@('Server1','Server2','Server3') | Out-File -LiteralPath c:\Temp\MyServerList.csv -Append;

## - Display the CSV file on Console:
cat c:\Temp\MyServerList.csv

## - Import the *CSV file into a PSObject:
$csvObj = Import-Csv -LiteralPath c:\Temp\MyServerList.csv;
$csvObj

ServerName
----------
Server1
Server2
Server3

It is better to use the Out-File cmdlet in this scenario. Also, let say you got multiple *CSV file with the same data structure, meaning the same column name(s). To merge into a single object the following one-liner can solve the problem:

## - Display on screen before creating the PSObject:
(Get-ChildItem C:\Temp\MyServer*.csv).FullName | import-csv

## - Build the PSObject:
$csvAllObj = (Get-ChildItem C:\Temp\MyServer*.csv).FullName | import-csv
$csvAllObj

Export PSObject to CSV

Now, the PSObject was created, go back and use the Export-Csv to create the *CSV file.

$csvAllObj | Export-csv -LiteralPath c:\Temp\MyPSObjectServerList.csv

cat c:\Temp\MyPSObjectServerList.csv
"ServerName"
"Server1"
"Server2"
"Server3"
"Server4"
"Server5"
"Server6"
"Server7"
"Server8"
"Server9"

Finally, a *CSV file was properly created!

Bottom line

The Export-Csv is meant to be use with well-structured PSObjects and is not meant to be use from a text file.

Of course, there are many other ways to get things done with PowerShell and that’s the beauty of it.
There’s always a way!

Be Bold!! Learn PowerShell Core!!

Quick blog on – How to recover/rebuild Master Database in Linux?

Back in March 30th, I posted a suggestion on SQL Server forum, about there was no documentation on how to rebuild SQL Server System database(s) in Linux.

https://feedback.azure.com/forums/908035-sql-server/suggestions/33805198-sql-server-2017-on-linux-system-databases-rebuild?tracking_code=befe44dc3ccdd27370ef0f54c9c8c975

The Issue – SQL Server stopped working

For some reason, I finished doing an “sudo apt update” follow by the “sudo apt upgrade“, and after doing some OS updates “my SQL Server stopped working”. The following message was logged in the log event: (see Image)

Command executed, looking at the last log entry:  “sudo cat /var/opt/mssql/log/system_health_0_131668975728890000.xel

I look everywhere for more information but found no blog post or any documentation about it.

To my surprise! I got a quick response which I appreciate very much.

The Answer

Execute the following command in the user context
/opt/mssql/bin/sqlservr –force-setup

And, will be seen this added to the SQL Server 2017 Linux documentation.

Thanks Microsoft!!

Remember

In Ubuntu I use the following command to check the status of my SQL Server instance:

sudo systemctl status mssql-server

Make sure the status is: active: (running)!

So, Backups are important! Even in Linux.  In my case, I’m running demos and love the fact that reinstalling SQL Server only took a few minutes. But, now I know another way to solve this issue!

And, the Mic is Dropped!!