PowerShell, SQL Server, and Linux Oh My!

The South Florida Code Camp 2017 is ON! Come and join me in this event on Saturday, March 11th 2017 all day event.

Check out the event speaking agenda: http://www.fladotnet.com/codecamp/Agenda.aspx

I will be presenting the following 3 sessions:

1. 09:50am – 11:00amWorking with SQL Server for Linux Cross-platform:
I will be showing the latest build of SQL Server vNext for Linux. Everything you need to install and connect to SQL Server. Then, what tools are available to use from either Linux and Windows. Sample on querying for database information using Python and PowerShell between two environments. This will be a demo intensive session.

2. 11:10am – 12:20pm Using Windows 10 Bash with PowerShell Open Source:
We’ll be taking a tour into Windows 10 Bash Linux subsystem. I’ll be sharing some tips on how to work with Bash, and the workaround to make PowerShell in side BASH. This is the perfect environment to start learning about Linux while you work in windows. We’ll be take advantage of how-to use cross-platform Open source product(s). All this and more from Windows 10.

3. 01:20pm – 02:30pm Using PowerShell Open Source across multiple Platforms:
PowerShell is Open Source now! Come see how you could use PowerShell cross-platform between Windows and Linux sharing scripts to assist in admin task automation. I’ll be walking on how to make this work with existing tools. Also, interacting with SQL Server for Linux.

To register go to the following link: http://www.fladotnet.com/codecamp/

IDERA Geek Synch Webinar – Wednesday February 22nd, 2017

Topic: Using PowerShell with Python and SQL Server


Description: Just as PowerShell is argued as the main technology for automation in Windows Datacenters Infrastructure, it is equally important in other non-Windows Operating Systems. According to Maximo Trinidad, Windows Administrators have an advantage working with PowerShell just as Linux Administrators have an advantage with Bash / PHP / Python.

Webinar starts at: 11:00AM – 12:00PM (CDT) / 12:00pm – 01:00pm (EST)

Register at: https://www.idera.com/events/geeksync

Florida PowerShell User Group Online Meeting – Thursday February 23rd, 2017

Topic:  Understanding Bash On Windows 10


Description: Come and learn how to setup and use Bash On Windows 10. Learn the tips and tricks to use PowerShell and Python together. At the same time, there are some differences in working with script files between Bash and Windows systems. We’ll be seen how to use efficiently use Windows apps with Python scripts on Bash. Lots of demo!

Meeting starts at: 6:30pm(EST)

Register at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/florida-powershell-user-group-monthly-meeting-february-2017-tickets-31689059831

Windows 10 Bash and PowerShell Redux

In my previous blog “http://www.maxtblog.com/2016/10/running-powershell-in-windows-10-bash-workaround/“, I was able to find a workaround to how work with PowerShell Open Source in Windows Bash subsystem.  But now, I found a better way using the Ubuntu Desktop component.

It’s a known fact, if you install PowerShell Open Source in Windows 10 Bash subsystem, that it won’t work correctly. As soon as start typing $PSVersionTable and press enter, the cursor goes to the top of the screen. And, you keep typing and it gets very ugly.

Now, what if I tell you, I found the way to run PowerShell Open Source without any of these issues. Just like running it like it was installed in a Linux environment. No issues with the cursor going crazy and able to page up and down.

The following are the steps required to run PowerShell Open Source.

Windows 10 Requirements

You *MUST* use the following Windows X Server application. Just proceed to Download and install VcXsrv Windows X Server:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/vcxsrv/?source=typ_redirect

Also, proceed to Download (to be install later) PowerShell Open Source. Go to the following Github link, and pick the Ubuntu 16.04 version: for Ubuntu 16.04:
https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/releases/tag/v6.0.0-alpha.14

For best results, make sure to be on Windows 10 Insider Build 15007.rs_prerelease.170107-1846.

If previously installed, reset your Windows 10 Bash Subsystem installation, by executing to following commands on either DOS or PowerShell prompt:
1. Uninstall command: lxrun /uninstall /full
2. Clean Installation: lxrun /install

*Note: I’m assuming you’ve been recently checking out Bash in Windows 10. If not, go to “Control Panel | Programs and features” then go to “Turn Windows features on or off” and enable “Windows Subsystem for Linux (Beta)“. By the way, you must have “Developer mode” enabled under “Settings | Update and Security | For Developers” section.

Then, on the Windows menu, look for the “Bash on Ubuntu on Windows” icon and open the console. Make sure Bash is installed and working in Windows 10.

Bash Subsystem Requirements

Now, we need to start installing some additional components in our Bash environment.  Please notice I can use PowerShell console and open “Bash“.  Also, while installing these Linux packages, make sure to open any console “as Administrator“.

Then, in Bash prompt, use the Super User privilege command “sudo su” before installing these packages.

sudo su

I recommend to use the following two command for the purpose of getting both available updates and upgrades to Bash installed packages. You could use these command on a regular basis to keep you subsystem up-to-date.

sudo apt update

sudo apt upgrade

The following commands will install the Ubuntu Desktop and takes about 1hr to complete. Patience is a virtue!

sudo apt install ubuntu-desktop

In some cases, at the end of the installation you will either see no errors, or it will end with the following message: “E: Sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (1)“.

Now, the next package installation install the desktop setting manager application you will need to use later;

sudo apt install compizconfig-settings-manager

So after all is done, use the “exit” command to get out of the Super User session and get back to your user session.

exit

Installing PowerShell

Now, we are ready to install PowerShell Open Source. Remember, if you follow above Windows 10 Recommendation section, you have already downloaded PowerShell. This file will be located in your “..Username\Downloads” folder.  From the Bash prompt, you’ll probably be seen “username@SystemName:/mnt/c/Users/username$” when you open the console as a regular user (non-Admin privilege).

The following commands change folder location to where the PowerShell installation package was saved and the execute the package.

cd Downloads
sudo dpkg -i powershell_6.0.0-alpha.14-1ubuntu1.16.04.1_amd64.deb

This package installation should end without any errors. Don’t open PowerShell yet!

The Ubuntu Desktop

First, in Windows 10, we need to start our “VcXsrv Windows X Server” application by clicking the Windows X Server “Launch” icon. Pay close attention to the field labeled “Display number” should have the value ‘0‘ and pick the “One large window“. Then clicking “Next” to accept all default values.

This will open a blank Windows X Server display.

Now, open “Bash on Ubuntu on Windows” prompt, and at this point there’s no need to open “as Administrator”. Type the following commands to start the “Ubuntu Desktop” in Windows 10:

export DISPLAY=localhost:0

This command will allow the any gui application to interact with our Windows X Server service.

Then, run the command ‘ccsm‘ to configure the Ubuntu Desktop settings: (This is a one time setup)

ccsm

Click “OK” to continue making settings changes following the images below.

After updating the settings, click “Close

To proceed to start the Ubuntu Desktop, just execute the following command:

compiz

You will notice there are some applications available to use.

Let’s concentrate of the ‘File’, ‘Text Editor’, and ‘Terminal’. You can manually execute some gui applications from the bash command prompt such as:
1. For File Browsing execute: nautilus or ‘sudo nautilus’ with elevaded security.
2. For Text Editor execute: gedit or ‘sudo gedit’ with elevated security.
3. For Internet browsing: firefox

Now, we are ready for PowerShell.

PowerShell in Windows 10 Bash

At the Ubuntu Desktop just right-click and pick “Open Terminal”. Then, type “powershell” and press enter.

Then execute the following powershell commands:

$psversiontable
dir

As you can see we, now PowerShell is working in Windows 10 Bash thank to Ubuntu Desktop. But, keep in mind, Ubuntu Desktop is not supported in Windows 10 Bash subsystem. At least, you can give it a test drive.

By the way, you can use your favorite PowerShell Editor

BONUS Section

Important Path to Remember, in case you’ll find where things are in Windows 10 Bash Subsystem.

Windows 10 BASH folders:
C:\Users\mtrinidad\AppData\Local\lxss
C:\Users\mtrinidad\AppData\Local\lxss\home\”Linux_UserName”
C:\Users\mtrinidad\AppData\Local\lxss\rootfs\usr\local\bin
C:\Users\mtrinidad\AppData\Local\lxss\home\”Linux_Username”\PowerShell

Bash file path to Windows folders:
/mnt/c
/mnt/c/Users/”Windows_UserName”/Downloads
/home/”Linux_UserName

Where PowerShell Open Source folder are located in Bash Subsystem:
/usr/local/bin/PowerShell

Additional Information:
Information about installing Ubuntu Desktop in Windows Bash:
— See link for info: https://github.com/Microsoft/BashOnWindows/issues/637

 

PowerShell Open Source Alpha14 and SQL Server for Linux CTP 1.1 are out!

This is Great! Microsoft keep delivering updates before Christmas just to keep us busy and excited.

To download the latest PowerShell Open Source just go to the link below:

https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell

Just remember to remove the previous version, and any existing folders as this will be resolved later.

To download the latest SQL Server vNext just check the following Microsoft blog post as the new CTP 1.1 includes version both Windows and Linux:

SQL Server next version Community Technology Preview 1.1 now available

And, don’t forget the check out the release notes as Microsoft SQL Server team has done an excellent job in providing documentation:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/linux/sql-server-linux-release-notes

For those interested in how SQL Server became to Linux, check the following Microsoft Blog posts:

SQL Server on Linux: How? Introduction

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2016/12/how-an-old-drawbridge-helped-microsoft-bring-sql-server-to-linux/

Additional Tools in the Horizon

Just an FYI on some tools that recently caught my attention from Jet Brain:

1. PyCharm Community Edition (free) – Python Develoment IDE Tool available for both Windows and Linux.
2. DataGrip – SQL Developer IDE Tools for working with Databases (including SQL Server). Also available for both Windows and Linux.

And, of course, we can’t forget of Microsoft VS Code. This lightweight coding IDE works great in both Windows and Linux:

https://code.visualstudio.com/

 

PowerShell Open Source – Windows PSRemoting to Linux with OpenSSH

I have to admit that I was waiting for this for some time. Finally, PowerShell 6.0.0-Alpha_13 can do remoting between Windows to Linux. This is Awesome!

microsoft-loves-linux

I’m going to give you the top-to-bottom scope in order to avoid going back-and-forth between link. So, it’s all here and including tips and print-screens.

Instructions for Windows OpenSSH installation

cd ‘C:\Program Files\OpenSSH’

  • Install sshd and ssh-agent services by using the following command line:
powershell -executionpolicy bypass -file install-sshd.ps1
  • Setup SSH host keys (this will generate all the ‘host’ keys that sshd expects when its starts).
 .\ssh-keygen.exe -A

winlinuxremoting_07_2016-12-02_11-23-28

  • Open Firewall (Windows PowerShell 5.x) Server: (This command works in Windows 10)
New-NetFirewallRule -Protocol TCP -LocalPort 22 -Direction Inbound -Action Allow -DisplayName SSH

winlinuxremoting_08_2016-12-02_11-23-28

  • Or for a Workstation:
netsh advfirewall firewall add rule name='SSH Port' dir=in action=allow protocol=TCP localport=22

winlinuxremoting_10_2016-12-02_11-23-28

  • Then, to set sshd in auto-start mode and open up firewall:
Set-Service sshd -StartupType Automatic
Set-Service ssh-agent -StartupType Automatic

winlinuxremoting_06_2016-12-02_11-23-28

  • Edit the sshd_config file at the location where you installed Win32 Open SSH and make sure to enabled the following lines:
    Port 22
    PasswordAuthentication yes
    RSAAuthentication yes
    PubkeyAuthentication yes

winlinuxremoting_02_2016-12-02_11-23-28

Also, add the following line to the Subsystem section:
Subsystem powershell C:/Program Files/PowerShell/6.0.0.13/powershell.exe -sshs -NoLogo -NoProfile

Finally, you must add the following line in the system path: “C:\Program Files\OpenSSH”

winlinuxremoting_09_2016-12-02_11-23-28

Failure to add this path line will cause the following error because it can’t execute sshd.exe:

winlinuxremoting_03_2016-12-02_11-23-28

If there’s a need to restart Windows SSHD services, just use the following PowerShell commands:

Stop-Service sshd
Start-Service sshd

Instructions for Ubuntu SSH installation:

  • Download using Ubuntu apt repository using sudo:
$ sudo apt install openssh-client
$ sudo apt install openssh-server
  • Make changed to Ubuntu sshd_config file to enabled some lines below:
$ sudo gedit /etc/ssh/sshd_config
  • Again, make sure to enabled the following lines:
    PasswordAuthentication yes
    RSAAuthentication yes
    PubkeyAuthentication yes
  • Add the following line to the Subsystem section:
    Subsystem powershell powershell -sshs -NoLogo -NoProfile

When done, in Ubuntu, just restart sshd service :

sudo service sshd restart

If you want to verify Ubuntu SSH is working, just type the following command:

ps -A | grep sshd

This should display a line showing sshd. If is blank, then is not on.

Connecting Linux to Windows

This is strange but, more likely, you will get an error the first time you try to connect. Just try the second try and it will work.

Enter-PSSession -Hostname earth2 -Username max_t

winlinuxremoting_11_2016-12-02_11-23-28

Connecting Windows to Linux

Again, I’ve seen the same behavior. It will fail the first time and the it will work.

Enter-PSSession -Hostname orion -Username maxt

winlinuxremoting_05_2016-12-02_11-23-28

What’s next?

After all have been tested, you can now connect from Windows to a Linux system. Then, you can execute your Linux commands from the Linux PowerShell session at your Windows Desktop. Is that amazing!!

Keeping things Simple!

Additional tips

This tips may not hurt to do:
1. winrm quickconfig
2. Run the ./InstallPsRemoting.ps1

winlinuxremoting_04_2016-12-02_11-23-28

Also, if you don’t have a domain set up, then set a workgroup environment, and adding the IP-Addresses, computer names for either Windows and Linux host file:
In Windows the *hosts file can be found under “C:\Windows\System32\Drivers\etc“, and in Linux Ubuntu can be found under “/etc/hosts“.

winlinuxremoting_12_2016-12-02_11-23-28

The editors need to be open “Run as Administrator” in order to make changes to this file. In Windows, open Powershell “Run as Administrator” the execute notepad:

notepad C:\Windows\System32\Drivers\etc\hosts

In Linux, use the sudo then the editor of choice;

sudo gedit /etc/hosts

I’m hoping this information will get you all going in doing PowerShell Remoting between Windows and Linux.

Additional Resource Information

OpenSSH Instructions at:
https://github.com/PowerShell/Win32-OpenSSH/wiki/Install-Win32-OpenSSH
https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/blob/309bf603f9aff9009dce7e725d42b2d4f99f58c9/demos/SSHRemoting/README.md

For Ubuntu questions:
https://help.ubuntu.com/community

Running PowerShell In Windows 10 BASH (workaround)

Yes! It’s possible. There’s a workaround make PowerShell to work in Bash for Windows. The only drawback, you still can’t do a Clear-Host (or clear or cls), at the PowerShell prompt.(yet)

(Updated 11/03/2016):  You can use Ctrl-L to clear the screen while using both ‘xterm’ and ‘screen’ while working at the console only.  At least is better than nothing!

poshbash_01_2016-10-02

The original behavior, and still is, the cursor goes to the top of the screen and it making hard to work.   This issues has been logged in Github PowerShell site:

But, let first install PowerShell for Bash on Windows.

Installing PowerShell

To identify which version of PowerShell to install, you’ll need to find what’s the Windows Bash version. Run the following Linux command:

username@hostname$ cat /etc/issue

poshbash_00b_2016-10-02

This command will show the Linux OS is Ubuntu Bash version is 14.04. Next is to  proceed to Github PowerShell and select to download the Ubuntu 14.04 version: https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/releases/tag/v6.0.0-alpha.10

Look for and click on “powershell_6.0.0-alpha.10-1ubuntu1.14.04.1_amd64.deb” to initiate the download.

Please understand that this file type is *.deb and will only install on the correct Linux OS version. This file will be download to your Windows “Downloads” folder and you won’t be able to execute from Windows File explore.

poshbash_00c_2016-10-02

Now, confirm you downloaded and can see the file under Bash subsystem by doing the following Linux command:

$ ls /mnt/c/Users/mtrinidad/Downloads

poshbash_00d_2016-10-02

To installing the PowerShell version for Ubuntu 14.04, do the following commands:

$ cd /mnt/c/Users/mtrinidad/Downloads
$ sudo dpkg -i powershell_6.0.0-alpha.10-1ubuntu1.14.04.1_amd64.deb
$ sudo apt-get install -f

Now, you can run PowerShell from the Windows 10 BASH prompt. But, it won’t be pretty useful. Yet!

What’s the workaround PowerShell in Bash for Windows

Basically, there are two application you can try:
In my case, I didn’t have to installed these applications.  But, if you need to install either application, the use the following command lines and answer “y” to install:
$ sudo apt-get install screen 
$ sudo apt-get install xterm
Now, there is one more application that might be useful to install using the same command format (see above). Its the GUI editor “gedit”:
$ sudo apt-get install gedit
This is a very practical text editor that remind me of Notepad.  Keep in mind, I’m coming from a Windows Ecosystem.  Of course, Linux expert may go for Vim or Emacs editors.

Xserver for Windows 10

 Two of these applications: xterm and gedit that will need Xserver running in Windows 10.  I’m currently using “VcXsrv” and can be downloaded from: https://sourceforge.net/projects/vcxsrv/
After installation, double-click on the XLaunch icon and select how-to display the program.
poshbash_00e_2016-10-02
Then, go back to the Bash prompt and type the following command the set the Xserver popup window, follow by the application. In this example will be executing “gedit“.
$ export DISPLAY=localhost:0
$ gedit /mnt/c/Users/mtrinidad/Documents/test.txt
poshbash_00f_2016-10-02
In order to use application(s) in *Xserver, its only one application at the time per Bash console open. In other word, to run two applications, you’ll need to open two Bash console to run each individually.
*Note: You will notice  Warning messages after exiting the application which can be ignored.
poshbash_00h_2016-10-02
Now, we got all we need to start working with PowerShell in Bash for Windows.

PowerShell – Using xterm

Now, to use “xterm“, you’ll need run the Xserver application “VcXsrv” as previously explained. Follow the steps: (In my case, I’m opening PowerShell Console in Administrator mode)

  • Open PowerShell Console (in Administrator mode)
  • Execute Bash
  • Then, at the Bash prompt type: $ export DISPLAY=localhost:0
  • Follow by: xterm

This will open a popup window for xterm application. In the xterm prompt, run powershell and you can start working with PowerShell.

$ powershell

poshbash_00i_2016-10-02

But wait!! You’ll notice that there’s no scroll bar to page up or down. I found the following link that fix the issue and you can enable the scroll bar using the mouse.
http://beforewisdom.com/blog/tech/xterm-with-a-scrollbar/

This is where you use gedit text editor to add the code to make the scroll bar to work with the mouse.

poshbash_00j_2016-10-02

Now you can use PowerShell to xterm application.

PowerShell – Using screen application

This is another workaround to work with PowerShell by using the “screen” application without the need of using Xserver program.

Just open the PowerShell console (in Administrator mode) then type “screen” and press enter.

poshbash_00k_2016-10-02

Oops! This application will need to be executed as super user:

poshbash_00l_2016-10-02

Keep pressing enter to bypass the screen information prompt.

poshbash_00m_2016-10-02

You will ended up at a # prompt, then you can execute PowerShell:

# powershell

And start working with PowerShell. But, again you’ll notice, you won’t be able to scroll up and down (again).  There’s not scroll bar!

Here’s how to fix the “screen” scroll issue: press Ctrl-A and then ESC. Now, the scroll up and down feature will be enabled.

poshbash_00n_2016-10-02

And, at the same time, both the arrows up/down keys are working during the remaining of your session.

poshbash_00o_2016-10-02

Now, exiting the “screen” application, you will ended up type the “exit” command a few times. About 3 time to get to the starting point.

poshbash_00p_2016-10-02

There’s no excuse not to use PowerShell In Bash for Windows. I have to admit it was little painful to gather this information and work around. But I think is very useful.  This is Awesome!

 Useful Resources

Make sure to check the GitHub incident email threads, mention in the beginning of this blog, which leads to make this workaround possible: #933 and #988, Community contribution made this possible.

Here are some addition links that help me push through this workaround:

** Xterm
http://beforewisdom.com/blog/tech/xterm-with-a-scrollbar/

** screen
http://www.saltycrane.com/blog/2008/01/how-to-scroll-in-gnu-screen/
http://neophob.com/2007/04/gnu-screen-cheat-sheet/

** Finding Linux version:
http://www.lostsaloon.com/technology/how-to-check-and-find-your-linux-os-version/

 

Linux Sky Application for “Skype for Business”

Yes! As started to spend time learning Linux I found this Linux application that allows me to use my Office365 account and share my desktop to other users using “Skype for Business”. I find this very interesting now that I could use this application to setup online presentations right off my Linux system.

sky01

Here’s the link to check it out: https://tel.red/linux.php

But, definitely is oriented for business organization that can afford the paying an annual fee of $45/per user activation. In the meantime, you can test this application which is limited a 2 minute limit on each call or screen share. They will send you a key to use within 24 hours.

Another missing feature, if you compare it to “Sky for Business”, is the session recording capability.  I mean, still is a great Linux app that will connect to you Skype members.

I can tell that their technical support will answer questions promptly and their email response was very good. They can also help and discuss any arrangement in order to get you going.

For now, their application only support domain users. But, I was told, that support for non-domain users will be available soon.

Installation was a challenge for me. Just because I’m not a Linux expert but I manage the figured out what was needed to complete the installation on my Ubuntu 16.04.1 desktop. They offered any Sky installation for various Linux distro.

Check out the images!  I think this product has potential for connecting Windows and Linux users.

ubuntusky

skylinux2_2016-09-11_19-56-21

I’m hoping to be able to at least do one of my Florida PowerShell User Group meeting with this product.

VS Code running PowerShell – Terminal session 3/3

Here’s the final blog. I’m going to show the third way to execute PowerShell:
1. VS Code – PowerShell Extension and Debug feature.
2. VS Code – Code Runner Extensions for PowerShell.
3. VS Code – Terminal session.
mslinux

 

VS Code – Terminal session

In Windows, we are configuring the VS Code “Integrated Terminal” to instead of executing Windows Cmd shell or Linux Bash, to use PowerShell Console.Then again, this is a quick change in the user “settings.json” in your script working folder.
vscodeps3_01_2016-09-23
Notice, by using the two forward slashes ” // … “, I commented out the original line that will execute Windows PowerShell.

 

After the change is made and restarted VS Code, use either the menu option “View | Integrated Terminal“, or just use key shortcut ” Ctrl + ` ” to open PowerShell.
vscodeps3_02_2016-09-23

 

In Linux, the *Terminal line change from “terminal.integrated.shell.windows” to “terminal.integrated.shell.linux“.  Of course, the PowerShell path change to “/opt/microsoft/powershell/6.0.0-alpha.10/powershell“.
vscodeps3_03_2016-09-23

 

*Note: Bug in VS Code Linux using Integrated Terminal, it won’t scroll up/down.
vscodeterminalbug
 ** Workaround for Scrolling Up/Down: Use Crtl-Shift-Up or Ctrl-Shift-Down.

 

Bonus on Extensions

These three blogs give you an insight on how to customized your VS Code editor.  So, every installed extension you can customized it on you “settings.json” file.  Where you find these settings? Look at the Default Settings (which are read-only) then look for the extension section.  You can then copy/paste the line you need into your custom “settings.json” and “launch.json” file.
Now, keep an eye in upcoming release of VS Code because it will come with a PowerShell integrated which is something everyone waiting.

VS Code running PowerShell – Debug 1/3

I recently went back to try using VS Code. Now that I’m fully invested with PowerShell Open Source in Ubuntu Linux 16.04.1 Desktop.  During trails and errors I found at least three ways to execute PowerShell:

1. VS Code – PowerShell Extension and Debug feature.
2. VS Code – Code Runner Extensions for PowerShell.
3. VS Code – Terminal session.

VS Code Extensions

First, we need to add a couple of extensions:
1. PowerShell
2. Code Runner

In below image, we are installing Python Extensions.  In Linux, having Python installed will be of great benefit.

powershellandpythonextensions

These are a most-to-have extensions to work with PowerShell. We are going to use the Debug feature.

Using VS Code Debug

First, we are going to use VS Code debug option to run PowerShell Out-Of-The-Box. This way we can be use debug to execute and step thru the PowerShell script code.

Open the folder were the scripts are going to be stored. The first time using the Debug it will ask to create the “launch.json” which is needed in order to execute and debug the script.  Accept the default values as you can change them later if needed.

launchjson

By the default, in Windows OS, it will execute Windows PowerShell ver 5.x.  In Linux, it will run the PowerShell Open Source. Keep in mind, I’m on a Linux system.

Next, is to create a new “settings.json” file, go to VS Code menu click on “File | Preferences | User Settings“.  In order to execute PowerShell Open Source, which is in a different folder, we need to create a “settings.json” file with the following code:

settingsjson_01

So, you’ll ended up with two *.json files in your script folder.  Then, you can customized these file to work with your script code when it gets debug.

setlaunchjson_04

Bonus Note: On a Windows System, if you want to customize VS Code to use PowerShell v6.0.0-alpha.x, just add the following line in the “settings.json” file:

changepowershelexepath

Next blog post, I’m going to cover “VS Code – Code Runner extension